first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, December 8, 2017 – Nassau – There is a great need for women to come to the forefront of the decision-making processes in the country.   This, according to female Parliamentarians, would ensure that issues relating to women are properly prioritized and addressed.   The Bahamas Branch of the Commonwealth Women Parliamentarians (CWP) sponsored a luncheon for the spouses of parliamentarians, department heads, and senior female government officials at Luciano’s of Chicago, December 4, 2017.    The event was held under the theme, “Strong Women, Leaders Unite.”Delivering the keynote address was Mrs. Patricia Minnis, wife of Prime Minister, Dr. the Hon. Hubert A. Minnis.  Mrs. Minnis said that women need to be more visible in order to effect change in the country.   To this end, Mrs. Minnis said that she is pushing for an Office of the Spouse of the Prime Minister.   She has already started the process by submitting a proposal for consideration by the Cabinet. She is currently awaiting a decision by the Cabinet.“I believe that as women, we should have a voice to speak to the issues that we face in the country,” said Mrs. Minnis.   “For that reason, I am pushing for this office, which I believe will help us to push for certain things relating to women and children, such as healthcare, the well-being of women and children and other issues.”Also delivering brief remarks was Minister of Social Services and Urban Development, and Chairperson of the CWP, the Hon. Lanisha T. Rolle, who said that even though much has been done to advance the causes of women, more work needs to be done.“The only way we can be strong is when we are united, and the only way we are united is to speak with one voice,” said the Minister.   “We have come far, and together we can go even further.Parliamentary Secretary in the Office of the Prime Minister, with responsibility for Information and Communications, Mrs. Pakesia Parker-Edgecombe delivered welcome remarks and expressed her appreciation as a participant in the event.   She noted, “We are all here today because of those who came before us who fought the good fight, which now allows us to enjoy some of the privileges and opportunities that we now have.”Past Chairperson and Member of Parliament for Englerston, the Hon. Glenys Hanna-Martin also delivered remarks. After thanking the CWP for the invitation, she said women are still under-represented in the country despite representing over 50 percent of the electorate.   Currently, females represent only 2 percent of the country’s cabinet. Worldwide, the average hovers around 10 percent.“We must find common ground despite serving on different sides of the political divide,” said Hanna-Martin.   “We have to find ways to channel our energies and unite on fundamental issues affecting women.”Also in attendance and bringing brief remarks was Senator, the Hon. Jobeth Coleby-Davis. Senator, the Hon. Dr. Jasmine Turner Dareus, offered the invocation.  Moderator for the luncheon was Senator, Dr. the Hon. Mildred Hall-Watson.   A video highlighting the contributions of women in the country was presented during the luncheon.By: Betty Vedrine (BIS)Photot captions:Header:  Wife of Prime Minister, Dr. the Hon. Hubert Minnis – Mrs. Patricia Minnis addressed the Bahamas Branch of the Commonwealth Women Parliamentarians (CWP) Luncheon at Luciano’s of Chicago, December 4, 2017.  (BIS Photo/Patrick Hanna)Insert: Bahamas Branch of the Commonwealth Women Parliamentarians (CWP) Luncheon at Luciano’s on Monday.  At the table, clockwise: Wife of the Prime Minister Mrs. Patricia Minnis (left), Past CWP Chairperson Englerston MP Glenys Hanna Martin (opposite), Senate President Katherine Forbes-Smith, Wife of Deputy Prime Minister Mrs. Sonia Turnquest (at right), and Minister of Social Services and Urban Development, and CWP Chairperson Lanisha Rolle (centre).  (BIS Photo/Patrick Hanna) Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

14 Sep / 2019

SEOmoz Buys Followerwonk

first_imgSEOmoz, a Seattle-based provider of search engine and social optimization software, has dipped into its $18 million Series B round raised in May to buy Followerwonk, a Twitter analytics firm. The deal, which officially happened in June, but has now come to light following a couple months of tech integration, furthers SEOmoz’s push into social media marketing tool development. The deal is a small one, and terms were not technically released, but SEOmoz CEO Rand Fishkin says in a blog post that it was between $1 million and $4 million and included cash up front, incentivized payouts and SEOmoz stock. The “wonk” in Followerwonk’s name is highly appropriate. The software provides deep analytics on Twitter followers by searching bios, the data from which can be sorted, filtered and exported. It also features a “compare users” function that shows follower overlap between users. The meat of Followerwonk’s platform is its Analyze Followers function, which provides details on geographic concentration, influence scores, gender distribution, follower/following counts, age, usage levels, language distribution and most active hours. The Followerwonk platform has been integrated into SEOmoz’s search marketing optimization software, which, says the company, has about 15,000 paid subscribers. Fishkin says SEO has played a big role for digital marketers, but social now is where the interest is particularly acute. “Companies are looking into alternative ways to do marketing on the web that’s not merely advertising,” he says. “Inbound marketing is a new frontier. The growth in SEO has been big in the last decade, and that will continue, but the trends in SEO and social are so intertwined. The person responsible for SEO is required to manage some social accounts and vice versa. That overlap is where we see the tools going as well.”last_img read more

first_imgLong back in 2005, MF Husain had once scribbled a line on an exhibition catalogue at Kumar Gallery- “Am I the relic of British Empire?”, which he did in the margin of a picture of his own work- a flamboyant self-portrait in full regalia juxtaposed with images of Mother Teresa, Lord Ganesha and polo players – that was titled ‘Relics of the Empire’.A collateral event of India Art Fair 2016, the group show titled ‘Celebration’ will be held in the national Capital from January 25 till February 5. The show, where oil on canvas once again will find a place in a group show at Kumar Gallery, also coincides with the 60th year of Kumar Gallery. Around 45 paintings will be showcased by modern masters and renowned artists. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The earliest work in the show is a1938 oil on canvas by Ram Kinkar Baij titled ‘Toilet’ (seated nude lady with maid combing her hair). Then, there is a late 1940s Jamini Roy depicting the finesse of his folk-based lines in a tempera work titled ‘Man with Hookah.Some of the other highlights of the show are a 1996 Rameshwar Broota titled ‘Scripted in Time’ (also the largest in the show at 70 by 90 inches), a 1984 acrylic on canvas titled ‘Radha in Vrindavan’ by KS Kulkarni and a striking work titled ‘The Foreman’ from 1961 by FN Souza. The show also includes never-seen-before works by Husain (a self portrait 1969), Paysage (1958) by SH Raza, rarely seen impastos on paper by Sohan Qadri and an oil on canvas titled ‘To The Market’ (1961) by NS Bendre.  Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe exhibition will also include artworks from the show and astute essays by art critic Keshav Malik, compiled in a comprehensive book of 200 pages. It will also have some of the early shows of modern masters at Kumar Gallery in the 1950’s and 60’s and most candid images of bonhomie amongst Indian artists, critics and their mentors, the Kumars. Captured at various events over the last six decades, these images in the book serve both as visual documentation of historical importance as well as reflect on the evolution and growth of modern Indian art. The show will also be a reflective of Kumar Gallery’s impeccable art collection. Sunit Kumar said: “This is the sixth edition of ‘Celebration’ show but this time, the emphasis is on modern masters whose aesthetic merit is not only publicly acknowledged but who are also academically most sound, the true avant garde of Indian modern art”.last_img read more

first_imgKolkata: The Kolkata Municipal Corporation (KMC) will open 16 free special cardio diabetic clinics soon, deputy Mayor designate Atin Ghosh said on Tuesday. The centres will come up in every borough and will be manned by specialised doctors. A costly equipment to do tests of retina will be set up at the KMC health office in Hatibagan. The specialised centres will function as referral centres. The KMC runs 144 health centres in every Ward where primary care is given to diabetic patients and even costly medicines are given free of cost. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeIt may be mentioned that the World Health Organisation (WHO) has predicted that India will be the main centre of four diseases by 2025. They are diabetes, coronary heart disease, cancer and depression. Diabetes has spread like wild fire in India in the past one decade. Its victims are people coming from various economic backgrounds. Children are also suffering from the disease. The number of renal failure cases has gone up due to diabetes. Sedentary habits are one of the major causes of diabetes. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killedThe KMC doctors who treat diabetic patients in the Ward clinics will refer those who need special attention. They will be examined by the specialists there. There will be educators also who will train patients about how to administer Insulin and the medicine will be given free of cost. The doctors who treat diabetes patients at the Ward level clinics have received training and are handling them regularly. They have been given training by expert endocrinologists. The number of diabetic patients in the KMC clinics is going up. Moreover, most of the patients do not do eye check-ups and are found to be suffering from diabetic retinopathy. Once the specialised clinics come up, there will be comprehensive treatment available. KMC officials regretted that as the medicines are given free of cost, many people think that the patients are not looked after properly.last_img read more

first_imgApril 3, 2018 “The future is right now — it’s just unevenly distributed.”  — William GibsonI am writing from inside the tech bubble to let you know that we are coming for your jobs.I recently met a pair of old friends for drinks in Manhattan. One is an executive who works at a software company in New York. They replace call center workers with artificial intelligence software. I asked her whether she believed her work would result in job losses. She responded matter-of-factly, “We are getting better and better at things that will make large numbers of workers extraneous. And we will succeed. There needs to be a dramatic reskilling of the workforce, but that’s not going to be practical for a lot of people. It’s impossible to avoid a lost generation of workers.” Her confidence in this assessment was total. The conversation then quickly shifted to more pleasant topics.Related: The How-To: Using Chatbots As A Tool For Customer ServiceI later met with a friend who’s a Boston-based venture capitalist. He told me he felt “a little uneasy” about investing in software and robotics companies that, if successful, would eliminate large numbers of jobs. “But they’re good opportunities,” he noted, estimating that 70 percent of the startups he’s seeing will contribute to job losses in other parts of the economy.In San Francisco, I had breakfast with an operations manager for a large tech company. He told me, “I just helped set up a factory that had 70 percent fewer workers than one even a few years ago would have had, and most of them are high-end technicians on laptops. I have no idea what normal people are going to do in a few years.”Normal people. Seventy percent of Americans consider themselves part of the middle class. Chances are, you do, too. Right now some of the smartest people in the country are trying to figure out how to replace you with an overseas worker, a cheaper version of you or, increasingly, a widget, software program or robot. There’s no malice in it. The market rewards business leaders for making things more efficient. Efficiency doesn’t love normal people. It loves getting things done in the most cost-effective way possible.A wave of automation and job loss is no longer a dystopian vision of the future — it’s well underway. The numbers have been telling a story for a while now that we have been ignoring. More and more people of prime working age have been dropping out of the workforce. There’s a growing mass of the permanently displaced. Automation is accelerating to a point where it will soon threaten our social fabric and way of life.Experts and researchers project an unprecedented wave of job destruction coming with the development of artificial intelligence, robotics, software and automation. The Obama White House published a report in December 2016 that predicted 83 percent of jobs where people make less than $20 per hour will be subject to automation or replacement. Between 2.2 and 3.1 million car, bus and truck driving jobs in the U.S. will be eliminated by the advent of self-driving vehicles.Read that last sentence again: The government is confident that between 2 and 3 million Americans who drive vehicles for a living will lose their jobs in the next 10 to 15 years. Driving a truck is the most common occupation in 29 states. Self-driving vehicles are one of the most obvious job-destroying technologies, but there are similar innovations ahead that will displace cashiers, fast-food workers, customer service representatives, administrative assistants and even well-paid white-collar jobs like wealth managers, lawyers and insurance agents, all within the span of a few short years. Suddenly out of work, millions will struggle to find a new job, particularly those at the lower end of the skill ladder.  Automation has already eliminated about 4 million manufacturing jobs in the U.S. since 2000. Instead of finding new jobs, a lot of those people left the workforce and didn’t come back. The U.S. labor force participation rate is now at only 62.9 percent, a rate below that of nearly all other industrialized economies and about the same as that of El Salvador and the Ukraine. Some of this is driven by an aging population, which presents its own set of problems, but much of it is driven by automation and a lower demand for labor.Each 1 percent decline in the labor participation rate equates to approximately 2.5 million Americans dropping out. The number of working-age Americans who aren’t in the workforce has surged to a record 95 million. Ten years into the nation’s recovery from the financial crisis and 95 million working-age Americans not in the workforce — I’ve taken to calling this phenomenon The Great Displacement.Related: Learning to Work With Robots Is How You Can Save Your JobThe lack of mobility and growth has created a breeding ground for political hostility and social ills. High rates of unemployment and underemployment are linked to an array of social problems, including substance abuse, domestic violence, child abuse and depression. Today 40 percent of American children are born outside of married households, due in large part to the crumbling marriage rate among working-class adults, and overdoses and suicides have overtaken auto accidents as leading causes of death. More than half of American households already rely on the government for direct income in some form. In some parts of the U.S., 20 percent of working age adults are now on disability, with increasing numbers citing mood disorders. What Americans who cannot find jobs find instead is despair. If you care about communities and our way of life, you care about people having jobs.This is the most pressing economic and social issue of our time; our economy is evolving in ways that will make it more and more difficult for people with lower levels of education to find jobs and support themselves. Soon, these difficulties will afflict the white-collar world. It’s a boiling pot getting hotter one degree at a time. And we’re the frog.In my role as Founder of Venture for America, I spent the past six years working with hundreds of startups across the country in cities like Detroit, New Orleans, Cincinnati, Providence, Cleveland, Baltimore, Philadelphia, St. Louis, Birmingham, Columbus, Pittsburgh, San Antonio, Charlotte, Miami, Nashville, Atlanta and Denver. Some of these places were bustling industrial centers in the late 19th and 20th centuries only to find themselves faced with population loss and economic transition as the 20th century wound down. Venture for America trains young aspiring entrepreneurs to work at startups in cities like these to generate job growth. We’ve had many successes. But the kinds of jobs created tend to be very specific; every business I worked with will hire the very best people it can find — particularly startups. When entrepreneurs start companies and expand, they generally aren’t hiring a down-on-his-or-her-luck worker in need of a break. They are hiring the strongest contributors with the right mix of qualities to help an early-stage company succeed. Most jobs in a startup essentially require a college degree. That excludes 68 percent of the population right there. And some of these companies are lifting further inefficiencies out of the system — reducing jobs in other places even while hiring their own new workers.Related: AI and Robots Are Coming for Your Job. Here’s What You Need to KnowThere’s a scene in Ben Horowitz’s book The Hard Things about Hard Things in which he depicts the CEO of a company meeting with his two lieutenants. The CEO says to one of them, “You’re going to do everything in your power to make this deal work.” Then he turns to the other and says, “Even if he does everything right, it’s probably not going to work. Your job is to fix it.” That’s where we’re at with the American economy. Unprecedented advances are accelerating in real time and wreaking havoc on lives and communities around the country, particularly on those least able to adapt and adjust.We must do all we can to reduce the worst effects of the Great Displacement — it should be the driving priority of corporations, government and non-profits for the foreseeable future. We should invest in education, job training and placement, apprenticeships, relocation, entrepreneurship and tax incentives — anything to help make hiring and retaining workers appealing. And then we should acknowledge that, for millions of people, it’s not going to work.In the U.S. we want to believe that the market will resolve most situations. In this case, the market will not solve the problem — quite the opposite. The market is driven to reduce costs. It will look to find the cheapest way to perform tasks. The market doesn’t want to provide for unemployed truck drivers or cashiers. Uber is going to get rid of its drivers as soon as it can. Its job isn’t to hire lots of people — its job is to move customers around as efficiently as possible. The market will continue to throw millions of people out of the labor force as automation and technology improve. In order for society to continue to function and thrive when tens of millions of Americans don’t have jobs, we will need to rethink the relationship between work and being able to pay for basic needs. And then, we will have to determine ways to convey the psychic and social benefits of work in other ways.There is really only one entity — the federal government — that can realistically reformat society in ways that will prevent large swaths of the country from becoming jobless zones of derelict buildings and broken people. Non-profits will be at the frontlines of fighting the decline, but most of their activities will be like Band-Aids on top of an infected wound. State governments are generally hamstrung with balanced budget requirements and limited resources.Related: Peter Thiel: Luck Is Just an Excuse For Not Working Hard EnoughEven if they don’t talk about it in public, many technologists themselves fear a backlash. My friends in Silicon Valley want to be positive, but many are buying bunkers and escape hatches just in case. One reason that solutions are daunting to even my most optimistic friends is that, while their part of the American economy is flourishing, little effort is being made to distribute the gains from automation and reverse the decline in opportunities. To do so would require an active, stable, invigorated unified federal government willing to make large bets. This, unfortunately, is not what we have. We have an indebted state rife with infighting, dysfunction and outdated ideas and bureaucracies from bygone eras, along with a populace that cannot agree on basic facts like vote totals or climate change. Our politicians offer half-hearted solutions that will at best nibble at the edges of the problem. The budget for Research and Development in the Department of Labor is only $4 million. We have a 1960s-era government that has few solutions to the problems of 2018.This must change if our way of life is to continue. We need a revitalized, dynamic government to rise to the challenge posed by the largest economic transformation in the history of mankind. The above may sound like science fiction to you. But you’re reading this with a supercomputer in your pocket (or reading it on the supercomputer itself) and Donald Trump was elected president. Doctors can fix your eyes with lasers, but your local mall just closed. We are living in unprecedented times. The future without jobs will come to resemble either the cultivated benevolence of Star Trek or the desperate scramble for resources of Mad Max. Unless there is a dramatic course correction, I fear we are heading toward the latter.Related: Emerging Ethical Concerns In the Age of Artificial IntelligenceOur society has already been shaped by large-scale changes in the economy due to technological advances. It turns out that Americans have been dealing with the lack of meaningful opportunities by getting married less and becoming less and less functional. The fundamental message is that we are already on the edge of dystopia, with hundreds of thousands of families and communities being pushed into oblivion.Education and retraining won’t address the gaps; the goalposts are now moving and many affected workers are well past their primes. We need to establish an updated form of capitalism — I call it Human-Centered Capitalism or Human Capitalism for short — to amend our current version of institutional capitalism that will lead us toward ever-increasing automation accompanied by social ruin. We must make the market serve humanity rather than have humanity continue to serve the market. We must simultaneously become more dynamic and more empathetic as a society. We must change and grow faster than most think possible.When the next downturn hits, hundreds of thousands of people will wake up to do their jobs only to be told that they’re no longer needed. Their factory or retail store or office or mall or business or truck stop or agency will close. They will look for another job and, this time, they will not find one. They will try to keep up a brave face, but the days and weeks will pass and they will become more and more defeated. They will almost always blame themselves for their lot. They will say things like, “I wish I’d applied myself more in school,” or “I should have picked another job.” They’ll burn through their meager savings. Their family lives and communities will suffer. Some will turn to substance abuse or watch too much TV. Their health will slip — the ailments they’ve been working through will seem twice as painful. Their marriages will fail. They will lose their sense of self-worth. Their physical environments will decay around them and their loved ones will become reminders of their failure.Related: Should Tipped Minimum Wage Still Exist?For every displaced worker, there will be two or three others who have their shifts and hours reduced, their benefits cut and their already precarious financial lives pushed to the brink. They will try to consider themselves lucky even as their hopes for the future dim.Meanwhile, in Manhattan and Silicon Valley and Washington D.C., my friends and I will be busier than ever fighting to stay current and climb within our own hypercompetitive environments. We will read articles with concern about the future and think about how to redirect our children to more fertile professions and livelihoods. We will retweet something and contribute here and there. We will occasionally reflect on the fates of others and shake our heads, determined to be among the winners in whatever the new economy brings.The logic of the meritocracy is leading us to ruin, because we are collectively primed to ignore the voices of the millions getting pushed into economic distress by the grinding wheels of automation and innovation. We figure they’re complaining or suffering because they’re losers.We need to break free of this logic of the marketplace before it’s too late.We must reshape and accelerate society to bring us all to higher ground. We must find new ways to organize ourselves independent of the values that the marketplace assigns to each and every one of us.As Bismarck said, “If revolution there is to be, let us rather undertake it not undergo it.” Society will change either before or after the revolution. I choose before.We are more than the numbers on our paychecks — and we are going to have to prove it very quickly.—This is an excerpt from Andrew Yang’s The War on Normal People, published by Hachette on April 3rd. To pre-order a copy click here. 14 min read Hear from Polar Explorers, ultra marathoners, authors, artists and a range of other unique personalities to better understand the traits that make excellence possible. Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. How Success Happens Listen Nowlast_img read more