first_img Instagram apostasy stirs controversy over Christian ‘influencers’ August 30, 2019 News Tagsaztec Concheros homepage featured Mexico Mexico City pre-Hispanic Zocalo,You may also like A Conchero dancer named Ariel applies makeup in Mexico City’s central square. “I am a Conchero to preserve the tradition,” he said. “I inherited it from my family. Seeing the people who come for inner peace gives me peace of mind.” RNS photo by Irving Cabrerra Torres Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,About the authorView All Posts Conchero dancer Aldair Trejo, who learned the rituals from his father, prepares a feathered headdress for a performance in Mexico City’s Zocalo. RNS photo by Irving Cabrerra Torres We are not all the same, and in our difference we are divine August 30, 2019 Concheros offer a ritual cleansing in Mexico City’s Zocalo. RNS photo by Irving Cabrerra Torres Yoyotzin Colibrí prepares incense used for spiritual cleansings. “I have been offering cleansings and dancing the Aztec tradition for 25 years,” she said. “Here everyone comes to seek healing.” RNS photo by Irving Carbrerra Torres Texas imam ordered to pay $2.55 million in sexual misconduct case Columns • Opinion • Simran Jeet Singh: Articles of Faith As Amazon burns, Vatican prepares for summit on region’s faith and sustainabilit … August 30, 2019 By: Irving Cabrera Torres Share This! Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email By: Irving Cabrera Torres Conchero dances honor pre-Hispanic gods and create a connection with the cosmos through meditative movement. Although Aztec and Mexican in origin, the dances are deeply rooted in the Chichimeca culture. RNS photo by Irving Cabrerra Torrescenter_img Catholicism Conchero dancers don their outfits for a day of performances in Mexico City’s Zocalo. RNS photo by Irving Cabrerra Torres From the ashes of defeat, the Conchero dance emerged, using traditional indigenous movement. Some say that the dance is a reenactment of the battle against the Spanish, with the steps containing hidden meanings and echoing old rituals, though few have been explicitly identified. The dances have been passed down through families for centuries. For many years, the dances were reserved only for indigenous people who forbid outsiders from viewing their ceremonies. There are dances especially dedicated to Huitzilopochtli (god of the sun and war), Quetzalcoatl (feathered serpent), Tlaloc and Tezcatlipoca (smoking mirror, supreme god, who is everywhere), among others.The dances also incorporated Christian elements and have been heavily influenced by Catholicism. Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,(RNS) — An ancient dance tradition with roots in Mexico’s indigenous culture, the Conchero calls down ancestral spirits to give their blessing and to purify observers through ritual smoke. Conchero dancers merge body and spirit in rhythmic harmony, giving thanks for creation in a ritual circle that represents the universe.  Share This! Irving Cabrera Torres According to Aztec philosophy, incense smoke administered by Concheros cleanses the spirit. Traditional herbs, such as basil, are used for the incense, along with more modern additions, like lollipops. RNS photo by Irving Cabrerra Torres The Metropolitan Cathedral was built on the site of the Templo Mayor, the former religious center of the Aztec city-state Tenochtitlan. Formerly a wholly religious ceremony, the Conchero dance now has cultural significance and is considered by many to be a folk dance. RNS photo by Irving Cabrerra TorresToday Conchero dances are considered Mexican folk dances and are performed in public, most frequently in Mexico City’s main square, the Zocalo, where even tourists receive cleansings and purifications from the Concheros.A Conchero performer stands as a guardian of Aztec and pre-Hispanic traditions next to the Metropolitan Cathedral. RNS photo by Irving Cabrerra Torres Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.,Truck drives into line of Jewish demonstrators protesting ICE in Rhode Island Conchero dancers perform in front of the Metropolitan Cathedral in Mexico City’s main square, the Zocalo. The cathedral stands on the site of the Aztec’s Templo Mayor, where Mexicans before the Spanish conquest venerated their gods Huitzilopochtli, Tlaloc and Coyolxauhqui. RNS photo by Irving Cabrerra TorresIt is widely believed that the Conchero dance tradition originated around the time of the Spanish conquest of the Aztec Empire. Around 1531, conquistadors confronted the Chichimecas, an ethnic group that inhabited the center of the country on the hill of Sangremal in present-day Querétaro state in central Mexico. During the battle, a shining cross appeared in the sky along with the Apostle James, whose message of peace provoked the surrender of the Chichimecas. Amulets used in Conchero dances on display in Mexico City’s Zocalo, including a turtle shell (standing in for the more traditional armadillo shell), snails, incense and pre-Hispanic figures made from obsidian. RNS photo by Irving Cabrerra Torres Irving Cabrera Torres,Add Comment Click here to post a comment Share This! By: Irving Cabrera Torres Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Emaillast_img read more

first_img Time in a bottle: Scientists watch evolution unfold Citation: Slower evolving bacteria win in the end (2011, March 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-03-slower-evolving-bacteria.html Professor Richard Lenski of Michigan State University in East Lansing and colleagues aimed to work out if some changes in DNA affect the evolutionary potential, or “evolvability,” of organisms.In the study, the researchers investigated four genetically distinct clones of Escherichia coli clones, and sampled them periodically to look for the presence of five specific beneficial mutations. They discovered that after 500 generations all lineages had acquired beneficial mutations but two had significantly more than the others, which should suggest they were more likely to survive in the long-term than the other line of bacteria. What they found instead was that after 1,500 generations the other two lineages had gone on to dominate.One of the co-authors of the paper, published in the journal Science, Dr Tim Cooper of the University of Houston, Texas, said the bacterial “race” could be compared to the fable of the hare and the tortoise, saying that the hare would win a 100 meter race, but the tortoise might win a marathon. In the “hare” bacteria at least four beneficial mutations were present at the 500th generation, but despite this after another 883 generations they were growing over two percent slower than the other lineages, and by the 1,500th generation, they were extinct in the flasks.To try to find out why, they used frozen samples of the 500th generation of bacteria and ran the evolution experiment again a number of times. In almost, but not all, of these experiments the “tortoise” clones went on to win.They discovered that one of the genes in which beneficial mutations were found at the 500 generation mark was topA, a gene involved in winding DNA into a twisted band, which makes it easier for genes to be turned on and off. The mutations were slightly different in the slow and fast evolving bacteria, with the mutation in the “tortoise” bacteria affecting the next link down in the protein’s amino acid chain.After the 883 generations the “tortoise” topA mutation had interacted with a mutation in another gene called spoT, which increased its fitness. The topA mutation in the other lineages did not interact so favorably with later mutations and the spoT mutation was rendered useless, and made the “hares” less fit for long-term domination.The bacteria used in these experiments are part of a larger evolution study that has been running since 1988, or over 50,000 generations, which makes it the longest-running evolution experiment in the world. The experiment began with a dozen strains of E.coli, bred from a single ancestor. Every 500 generations (75 days), samples of the mixed-strains are frozen and stored and the mean fitness is compared to that of the ancestor. (PhysOrg.com) — Scientists in the US have found bacteria that evolve slowly are more likely to survive in the long term than those evolving more quickly. © 2010 PhysOrg.com Explore further More information: — myxo.css.msu.edu/ecoli/– Second-Order Selection for Evolvability in a Large Escherichia coli Population, Science 18 March 2011: Vol. 331 no. 6023 pp. 1433-1436, DOI:10.1126/science.1198914 This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. A scanning electron micrograph of E. coli. Credit: NIHlast_img read more

first_imgWhat attractions do you mention when talking about Australia?Source = e-Travel Blackboard: A.N Are you being talked about? Is your attraction ranking up there with the big boys?TripAdvisor has created a list of the most talked about Australian attractions based on the number of reviews submitted in 2012.The top ten were more or less obvious, however the next ten were somewhat surprising.Top ten talked about attractions in Australia:Sydney Harbour (Sydney)Sydney Opera House (Sydney)City Circle Tram (Melbourne)Sydney Harbour Bridge (Sydney)The Rocks (Sydney)Royal Botanic Gardens (Sydney)The Opera House to the Botanic Gardens Walk (Sydney)Kings Park & Botanic Garden (Perth)Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne (Melbourne)Melbourne Cricket Ground (Melbourne) Some places are worth talking about.Image: Lone Pine Koala Sanctuarycenter_img Other most talked about attractions in AustraliaMelbourne Zoo (Melbourne)South Bank Parklands (Brisbane)Manly Beach (Sydney)Bondi to Coogee Beach Coastal Walk (Sydney)MONA (Hobart)Eureka Skydeck 88 (Melbourne)Australian War Memorial (Greater Canberra)Cairns Esplanade Swimming Lagoon (Cairns Region)Block Arcade (Melbourne)Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary (Brisbane)last_img read more