first_imgSouth Florida appears to be the epicenter of the coronavirus in the state with 70 cases in Broward, Miami-Dade and Palm Beach counties.Broward has the most with 39. An Orange County woman is the fifth resident to die of the virus and health officials say the 79-year-old had underlying health issues. A mandatory curfew in the Town of Palm Beach will start tonight to combat the spread of the coronavirus. Also all public beaches on Palm Beach will be closed.——Efforts are underway to make it easier to get tested for the coronavirus in Broward and Palm Beach Counties.BROWARD COUNTY, FL – Parks have been taking precautions to protect the health of our employees, guests, and the community from exposure to COVID-19. Broward County Parks are open for passive use only, and the following will be put into effect immediately until further notice: Election locations at Broward County Parks are open. All organized athletic leagues, games, races, practices, and tournaments are canceled. All recreation programs are canceled. All permitted events, such as spring break camps and camp trips (both public and private) are canceled. Halls and shelter rentals are closed. Water parks are closed – Castaway Island, Paradise Cove, Splash Adventure, and Tropical Splash. The splash pad at Miramar Pineland is closed. Barkham at Markham and Woofing Waters at Quiet Waters are closed. Marinas are closed – Plantation Heritage, Quiet Waters, Tree Tops, T.Y., and West Lake parks. The velodrome is closed. The Target Range at Markham is closed. Deerfield Island Park and Hollywood North Beach Park are closed. Nature center exhibit halls are closed.All programs and rental reservations will be credited or fully refunded.The following concessionaires and public/private partners will also close to the public: All Golf at C.B. Smith Park, Pembroke Pines. Broward Ski & Wakeboard School at C.B. Smith Park. Butterfly World at Tradewinds Park & Stables, Coconut Creek. Equine-Assisted Therapies at Tradewinds Park & Stable, Coconut Creek. Everglades Holiday Park airboat rides and gator shows. Koslov Tennis Academy (C.B. Smith Park) and Lakeshore Tennis Center (Brian Piccolo Sports Park & Velodrome). Ski Rixen USA at Quiet Waters Park. Zack’s Snacks at Hollywood North Beach Park.With health as our top priority, it’s hard not to think of how our parks help us by reducing anxiety and stress. If patrons are able and it feels safe, take a walk or bike ride in a park. Visitors should follow the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): wash your hands; avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth; avoid close contact with people who are sick; and put a distance of six feet between yourself and other people.Parks’ employees continue to follow CDC personal hygiene recommendations and are increasing sensitization of our facilities.As the current situation changes daily, we encourage everyone to check for any updates by visiting Broward.org/Parks.For more information about COVID-19 visit Broward.org/Coronavirus.last_img read more

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisThis years 4th of July Parade was themed Rosie the Riveter. Rosie played a pivotal part in american history where women defied the odds and that’s exactly what Alpena celebrated today.Back in WWII  millions of women took over the industrial labor force while their husbands were in combat, that’s when the term Rosie the Riveter was created.Rosie represented strong, independent women who were capable of taking care of anything and everything. This year Alpena recognized those women who paved the way for so many..Meet Dorothy Lafleche she was the grand marshal in today’s 4th of july parade and Alpenas own Rosie the Riveter. Dorothy broke down barriers and represented strong women who stepped up and showed the world there is not much a woman can’t accomplis.All while carrying herself with class, strength and honor Dorothy did what she had to do until of course,her love returned homeAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisContinue ReadingPrevious Exactly 1,000 rubber duckies race for a good causeNext Sail with the kids this summer on the Thunder Bay Riverlast_img read more

first_imgChelsea began their Premier League campaign with a commanding two-goal victory over Hull City in Jose Mourinho’s first game back in charge of the West London club.The Blues dominated from the word go and had a penalty after five minutes to take the lead, but Frank Lampard saw his effort saved by Allan McGregor, who had needlessly taken out Fernando Torres to concede the spot kick.The deadlock was broken soon after in the 13th minute when debutant Kevin de Bruyne slid in Oscar to poke under the onrushing McGregor.After again being denied by McGregor’s right hand, Lampard got his goal midway through the opening half when his 30-yard free kick dipped and swerved to deceive McGregor.Goal-line technology was used for the time in English football right on half time when Branislav Ivanovic’s point-blank header was somehow pushed away under the crossbar by Scottish international McGregor.Jon Moss’s watch must not have flashed ‘GOAL’ and virtual images showed that all of the ball did not cross the line. The second half was much more languid as Chelsea eased off the gas and saw the result home.In fact, Hull came closest to scoring the third goal when Curtis Davies rose highest to meet Ahmed Elmohamady’s cross and head goalwards but it was well held by Petr Cech.Down the other end Lampard rocketed another free kick inches wide as Mourinho gave debuts to Andre Schurrle and Marco van Ginkel.Schurrle almost opened his account instantly but chipped narrowly over the crossbar with just McGregor to beat.last_img read more

first_imgShrewsbury – The Community YMCA’s youth and teen leadership programs, including Teen Achievers, Model United Nations, Youth & Government and Girls Circle, encourage the development of strong leaders with positive civic attitudes, skills and behaviors. At the Y’s Youth Achievement Award Celebration on June 6 at the Y’s Administration Office in Shrewsbury, participants were awarded for their commendable displays of leadership in their respective programs.This year, over 500 area youth benefitted from the Y’s youth and teen leadership programs, which are designed to help prepare them for college and jobs.“We are truly proud of all that our youth and teens achieved this year through our leadership programs,” said Jo Ann Rountree, The Community YMCA Senior Director of Community Outreach.  “Above all, the Y believes that all kids deserve the opportunity to discover who they are and what they can achieve.”Tristan Sweeney, Middletown, was awarded the Model United Nations (Model UN) Leadership Award and Aisling Howley, Brick, for Youth & Government. Sara Eng and Kaitlin Noel, both of Holmdel, were recipients of the Civic Engagement Award for their participation in both Model UN and Youth & Government. Kyle Rodney, Middletown, also a participant in both programs, received the Outstanding Middle School Participant Award.Teen Achievers offers practical guidance about preparing for college and provides students the opportunity to improve academically and develop a successful career path. The Achievers Program provides the participating teens with mentoring, assistance with college readiness and support for a successful school to work transitions. This year, Achievers expanded to schools in Lakewood and Long Branch.Model UN provides middle and high school students the opportunity to research and debate issues of international relevance. This program aims to help students gain an appreciation for international affairs and cultural differences.The Youth & Government program affords middle and high school students the chance to become involved in the legislative process while working with other teens. Participants have the opportunity to write and defend their own bill in the New Jersey Senate/ House Chambers in Trenton.Girls Circle, the newest leadership program, has expanded to Red Bank. This program encourages the development of strength, courage, confidence, honesty and communication skills in girls ages 12-18. The goal of this program is to give girls the ability to take full advantage of their talents, academic interests, career pursuits and potential for health relationships.The Youth Achievement Awards ceremony also featured guest speakers, Jackeline Fuertes and Sean Byrnes, both YMCA volunteers, who shared their experiences with students and the positive personal impact of their involvement.For more information about The Community YMCA’s teen leadership programs, please visit TheCommunityYMCA.org.last_img read more

first_imgIf misery truly loves company, boy do Bay Area football fans have something to share with the rest of the county on Thursday night.Behold our two NFL teams with a combined two victories after another pair of unsightly collapses on Sunday. The Raiders’ unreal fourth-quarter nosedive in their 42-28 loss to the Colts was tame compared with how the 49ers blew a 12-point lead in a last-minute defeat in Arizona. We’re conditioned to call the Raiders vs. 49ers game on Thursday the Battle of the …last_img read more

first_imgThutong – “place of learning” in Setswana – features a searchable database of annotated web-based curriculum resources for various education sectors, grades and subjects.The portal is a free service to registered users, who must go through a once-off, no- cost registration process. (Image: Thutong)Brand South Africa ReporterThe government’s education portal – www.thutong.org.za – aims to improve learning in South Africa through technology.Launched in 2005, it offers a range of free educational resources: curriculum and learner support material, professional development programmes for teachers, and administration and management resources for schools.Thutong – “place of learning” in Setswana – features a searchable database of annotated web-based curriculum resources for various education sectors, grades and subjects.It also carries news and information on the latest developments in education in South Africa.As Thutong’s key focus is to create “strong and vibrant’ online communities of practice, users are encouraged to connect and share information and ideas with experts and their peers throughout the country and overseas.Virtual communities have been set up according to interest groups, and their are communities for each learning area and subject. Other groups focus on grades and phases, or special interest such as “inclusion’ and “mobile learning’.There are also groups focused on school management, administration and teacher education. The portal’s resources are designed to encourage and develop professional and lifelong learning.The portal is a free service to registered users, who must go through a once-off, no- cost registration process.Teachers grappling with the challenges of introducing the new Curriculum and Assessment Policy can browse different “learning spaces’, where policy documents are explained as well as downloadable printable, quality-assured resource material.Users are encouraged to rate the resources for quality and usefulness, and to submit and share content they might have developed themselves in the course of their teaching.In its user guide, Thutong says that as it is an online community developed to help and support South African teachers, its usefulness is dependant on the richness of the interactions between community members.“It is, therefore, essential that community members express their views using the blogs and forums, contribute materials through the upload facility and subscribe to newsletters.’Users are encouraged to make use of the free resources and to print, photocopy, and distribute them for no profit – as long as they acknowledge the source.Thutong also serves as a one-stop South African education policy shop, carrying national and provincial policy documents and legislation plus amendments, annotated versions, commentary by experts, and summaries.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

first_imgLIST: Class, gov’t work suspensions during 30th SEA Games Out for more than six months because of a hip injury, Pingris practiced for the first time on Monday as the Hotshots were preparing to slug it out with Phoenix Petroleum in two days, seeking to keep their immaculate elimination round slate intact.But coach Chito Victolero is not about to rush his ace power forward back into action.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“He needs to get his timing back,” Victolero said.“Relatively, he played well (in practice), but we will not rush him. He needs to get his rhythm back and hopefully, he can rejoin us soon.” Pingris went to the United States for rehab and therapy and will definitely be of big use to the Hotshots, who were ousted in painful manners in the Philippine Cup and the Commissioner’s Cup.Star has the tools to go all the way and has been in all pre-conference hypes because of a solid roster that could rival San Miguel, which claimed the Hotshots’ scalps in the Commissioner’s Cup Final Four before winning the championship over TNT KaTropa.With a 3-0 record, Star is the only unbeaten team in the ongoing season-closing conference.ADVERTISEMENT UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games LATEST STORIES Busmen seek repeat over Tajik club Read Next Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnessescenter_img Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief PBA IMAGESStar, the team tipped to give Grand Slam-seeking San Miguel Beer a run for its money in the PBA Governors’ Cup, is about to get a much-needed boost.Marc Pingris, the hard-nosed anchor of the Hotshots’ defense, is set to make a return to active play within the next two games at the soonest as Star tries to crack a championship series for the first time this season.ADVERTISEMENT SEA Games: PH’s Alisson Perticheto tops ice skating short program MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games View commentslast_img read more

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Chelsea defender Christensen hopes Mount injury not seriousby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea defender Andreas Christensen hopes Mason Mount’s injury isn’t serious.Mount was forced off early in their Champions League defeat to Valencia.Christensen said, “Mason has been very important for us, he is great for us in our build-up and he is dangerous in front of goal so obviously he was a big loss, but then we have great players to come on so it should not hurt us too much. Hopefully he is not too bad as he is an important player.”On Ross Barkley’s late spotkick miss, the Dane added: “We know Ross, he is going to take the next one as well, he always feels confident with penalties, he is one of the best ones which is why he was on the penalty today.” last_img read more

first_imgHead coach John Calipari of the Kentucky Wildcats acknowledges the fans during practice for the NCAA Men's Final Four.INDIANAPOLIS, IN – APRIL 03: Head coach John Calipari of the Kentucky Wildcats acknowledges the fans during practice for the NCAA Men’s Final Four at Lucas Oil Stadium on April 3, 2015 in Indianapolis, Indiana. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)It turns out it isn’t just SEC football fans who are willing to go above and beyond to display their fanhood on a daily basis. Sunday night, a Kentucky hoops supporter named Gina Estep tweeted a photo of her friend, who is pregnant, showing just how much she’s into Wildcats basketball. The UK supporter has painted her stomach into a basketball and added two Kentucky logos. It’s [email protected] Thought you would enjoy this soon to be UK fan:) pic.twitter.com/DtOlhdpSal— Gina Estep (@Ginadawn1) February 16, 2015Score another win for Kentucky – the Wildcats are certainly going to add one more hardcore fan very soon. Props.last_img read more

first_imgGary Dimmock is a senior reporter with the Ottawa Citizen. While at Rideau High School the twins said they were kept apart. Carlos excelled in sports, including boasting ‎he ran a 12.6 second 100-metre dash at 17. He also says he was naturally gifted at hockey, football and volleyball, but lacked the guidance to take it further.He also describes himself as the kid “hiding in the corner” at school. When he graduated high school he didn’t know what to do.He got a job laying tile for a construction company. He didn’t like making $11-an-hour and quit, but says he was good at it.Then he started selling cocaine at about 19.“I just looked at my family and I’m like ‘I’m supposed to be a drug dealer.’ I started being a hustler,” Carlos says.That escalated to pimping women in the sex trade, even himself to “cougars”. “I started at a half-ball (couple grams) and worked my way up to a half-bird (half kilogram),” he says, proudly.He lived in the “spotlight.” Had girls, and felt like he was big deal with money.He claims to have owned multiple vehicles and woke up counting stacks of cash. But at around 23 he felt something was missing and he had been snorting his own stash for a while. He was becoming his father.“I realized I’m a piece of shit. I’m a piece of shit. I hate myself … and I was on a path of destruction,” he says.Meanwhile, his brother had found Islam after years of abusing drugs since the age of 12. “In my 20s, my life started changing around and I discovered Islam and started changing my life for the better,” Ashton says. When they were both about 12 they said their mom wanted nothing to do with them. They went to live with their grandmother Linda Brennan, their father’s mother, in Ottawa’s rough Overbrook neighbourhood.There they got food and clothes – but both said that is about it. They also learned “the Game” as their grandmother was a drug dealer.Around this time Ashton and Carlos, who had been “twin tight” as kids, became polar opposites. Ashton fell into drugs, selling and using. He was angry at the world.“I used (drugs) as an outlet to vent my frustrations and my depression and my stress,” he says. “It was easier to go pick up a crack scale, go grab crack and chip it down.”Carlos would stay in his room and play video games.“This is when life gets better, but kind of shittier at the same time. Moved in with my grandma, had all the junk food, anything we wanted, we got … but we lived in a smoke chimney and a drug house. People think it’s cool, but it’s not cool. I would never want any child to have to experience what I did,” he says.He recalls one day police kicked his grandmother’s door in yelling “the pharmacy is closed” in a drug raid.He also can’t forget the day his grandmother’s dog was knifed to death. (Ashton Larmond, left, and his twin brother Carlos.)Kenneth Jackson and Gary Dimmock APTN National News Ashton Larmond was a little boy when he walked in the bathroom of his home and saw a man trying to drown his mom in the tub.He had her by the hair plunging her head in the water.Then she saw Ashton – standing at the door.“She looked at me,” he said. “I‎ remember the look on her face.“She said, ‘It’s okay, sweetheart.’”He ran away and police came.He fought tears recalling the memory of his childhood.It’s just one of many he and his twin brother Carlos Larmond recall growing up in – as they call it – the gutter of Ottawa.That’s before the entire country knew their names after they were nabbed by RCMP on terrorism charges in January 2015 for wanting to join the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL).Both pleaded guilty in August – Ashton was sentenced to 17 years and Carlos, seven. The judge likened their extremist Islamic belief to worshiping the devil. But the judge heard little of the life the brothers came from.That’s because there was no pre-sentence report or, in the twins case, a report that highlights Gladue principles – something the Supreme Court of Canada said all lower courts must take into account when the liberty of an Indigenous person is at stake.The brothers claim to be Algonquin and were interviewed by a Gladue report writer shortly after they were arrested.Recordings of those interviews have never been heard – not by the RCMP or the twins’ lawyers – until now.The exclusive recordings make up this story, along with confidential RCMP documents, obtained by APTN National News and the Ottawa Citizen that show how two Ottawa kids got swept up in the madness of ISIL.Ashton and Carlos Larmond were born about 18 minutes apart on Nov. 21, 1990 in Ottawa.Their mother Michelle Ruthven lives in Ottawa but hails from Texas and, as the brothers put it, is “all-American.”Their father Anthony Larmond is from Pembroke, Ont., but grew up in Ottawa. His family line can be traced to the Algonquin in the Ottawa Valley, and the boys, despite now being Muslim, identify as Algonquin and obtained membership cards with the non-status Algonquins of Ontario – a group fighting the federal government for land in the valley. Almost from the beginning the boys arrived into a world “set up for failure.”Dad was a drug dealer who became a drug addict. He robbed banks to pay for his habit. He just wasn’t any good at it.He has spent most of his life behind bars. In fact, when his sons were arrested he was in a halfway house in Toronto on his latest bank robbery conviction. He broke his parole shortly after and blamed his kids for it. center_img Carlos reached out to his brother who had been trying to get him to join his faith.But by then the RCMP were already on to Ashton.In the summer of 2013, the RCMP intercepted conversations between Ashton and John Maguire, a fellow Ottawa young man who flew overseas and joined ISIL in December 2012. In those discussions, Ashton told Maguire he wanted to join him.According to RCMP documents, Ashton’s mother called the Ottawa police in September 2013 saying her son wanted to go kill for terrorists. Days later Ashton’s passport was revoked as he had bought a ticket overseas.It’s not clear how the RCMP was keeping an eye on Ashton as the months passed.It wasn’t until February 2014 that the RCMP finally approached Ashton who was living at the Salvation Army shelter in downtown. He denied wanting anything to do with terrorism. Ashton was convinced the RCMP was watching him after, but documents don’t suggest it. The RCMP doesn’t appear to take Ashton serious until after a lone shooter gunned down a reservist guarding the National War Memorial in October 2014, then stormed Parliament Hill with ease before being gunned down inside Centre Block by security and the RCMP.It was then that the RCMP launched Project Slipstream focusing on Ashton and several other local men. Around that time Carlos accepted his brother’s extremist views – just a few months before their eventual arrests.“I got off drugs like two months before and then I got arrested and boom,” Carlos says. ‎ Despite the charges he was facing, he adds, “My mental state today is way different than it was … when I was all strung out. What really helped was my spiritual healing.”The RCMP used an informant to get inside Ashton’s circle who recorded the brothers talking about joining ISIL. To date, that informant has been paid nearly $800,000 for his work against the brothers.Carlos, who describes himself as “the smart one” of the brothers, was secretly recorded by the informant that he thought it was best they stayed in Canada and laid low. But on Jan. 10, 2015, Carlos was arrested trying to board a plane in Montreal to overseas and join ISIL – something he now can’t believe he was going to do, according to comments made by his lawyer after sentencing.Ashton was also arrested despite not having a passport, as he had planned an elaborate trip through the Arctic to join his brother. A few days after their arrest Maguire was reported to have been killed fighting for ISIL.Gladue report writer Mark Marsolais met with the Larmond brothers in April 2015.The twins met with Mark Marsolais about a month following their arrest. It was a quick meeting, basically Marsolais introduced himself and said he wrote Gladue reports for Indigenous people facing incarceration in Ottawa.The brothers said they were Algonquin and agreed to be interviewed thinking it would help them get bail, which they did not get.In April 2015, Ashton was interviewed once and Carlos, twice. In total, they spoke for over three hours describing their chaotic lives and stressing if they had any sort of guidance growing up they wouldn’t be where they were – something the Supreme Court calls Gladue principles.“Terrible,” is how Marsolais described their lives. “Product of their own environment. They had a terrible life. They were brought up in a dysfunctional family. They were basically set up for failure right from the get-go.”Marsolais said he lost contact with the brothers shortly after interviewing them. Both were moved out of Ottawa for safety reasons. He said no one followed up with him to complete the reports, which he agreed to do for free, and believes the judge could have benefited from reading a report on the brothers.The day they were sentenced the court did hear a bit about their lives according to Ashton’s lawyer Joe Addelman.Addelman said he reminded the judge the brothers are Indigenous and Gladue principles needed to be applied, but that is as far as it went.The judge came back within an hour and gave his indictment, and found Ashton was clearly the leader.During the jailhouse interviews, the brothers admit they have limited knowledge of their Indigenous history and ‎Carlos says he always asked his grandmother about his Algonquin family, but it was never part of their life.Ashton blames residential schools and other issues with colonization as to why his family was disconnected from its past. Both say when they get out they want to go live “on the reserve.”“If I do get a Native piece of land on the reserve I’d like to build my own little log cabin and live peacefully,” says Carlos.But he wants his story told.“This is an original story … I’m going to let the world know what my story is,” he says. [email protected] Jackson is a senior reporter with APTN National News. (Carlos speaks about his father in prison to Gladue report writer Mark Marsolais. Caution: strong language.)Their mother struggled raising two “hyper boys” and moved them around a lot. From Ottawa to Texas, then to Oshawa and back to the Ottawa area.Both of them recall not having much, and when in Oshawa they would eat old potato chips from dumpsters. Early school life saw them in special needs classes from Grade 4 to 8. “Food was never around. That was a luxury for us,” Carlos says on audio-tape. “A family is like a luxury for me and people take it for granted. These people in this prison (Ottawa’s local jail where they were held at the time) have a family, a father, grandparents are all connected. These criminals – and these losers – and I’m like what is wrong with you? You have something I never had that I would trade everything in the planet for.” Carlos is haunted by memories of when he was with his mom – where he and his brother suffered unspeakable abuse by men they looked to for guidance.last_img read more