first_imgA crowd of nearly 70,000 turned out to Soccer Aid at Manchester United’s Old Trafford this week to witness Michael Sheen’s Rest Of The World team defeat England in a pulsating encounter between the two sides, by four goals to two.A second half hat trick from Rest of The World’s ’s former dutch international Clarence Seedorf, and a great chip from 25 yards from Nicky Byrne cancelled out a long range effort from Jamie Redknapp and a penalty from Kevin Phillips to win the much coveted Soccer Aid trophy.By the time the final whistle blew ITV viewers had pledged over £2million to UNICEF’s vital work saving children’s lives, which will be matched by the UK Government pound for pound, bringing the total to £4.2 million so far. The final figure will be announced in due course.The winning team also included Gordon Ramsay, James McAvoy, Sam Worthington, and more. The England team included Stephen Moyer, Olly Murs and John Bishop.David Bull, Executive Director UNICEF UK: “Tonight at Soccer Aid we’ve shown how the power of sport can unite people to help save and change children’s lives all over the world. As a result of the generosity of the British public, and the Aid Match from the UK Government, UNICEF will be able to get life-saving food, medicine and clean water to some of the world’s most vulnerable children. We’re incredibly grateful to everyone who donated tonight.”International Development Secretary Justine Greening added: “The incredible public response to Soccer Aid shows Britain at its best. We are backing the generosity of the British people by matching all donations to Soccer Aid pound for pound, helping UNICEF double its impact.”“That means even more women giving birth safely and more children getting life-saving vaccinations and nutritious food in some of the world’s poorest countries.”The public can continue to donate to UNICEF by texting the word CHILD to 70333 to give £5. Lines are open until the 30th June 2014.last_img read more

first_imgDennis Ward APTN National NewsA woman who says she lost almost everything in Manitoba’s flood of the century is now at risk of losing more.That`s because the province’s housing authority is accusing her of being a [email protected]last_img

first_imgJanuary 22, 2015 2 min read This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Nowcenter_img While online education has been gaining traction in America for roughly 15 years, the inevitable maturation and spread of this technology into developing countries is bound to spark a revolution.That was a key takeaway from a letter penned by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation — which, with an endowment of $42.3 billion, represents one of the largest private foundations on earth.On this, its 15th anniversary, the Foundation laid bare its hopes for the world over the next 15 years — including the prediction that online education will reach hundreds of millions of people across the globe.Related: Duolingo, the Chart-Topping Language App, Unveils a Platform for TeachersThe growth of high-speed cell networks and a proliferation of affordable devices will largely fuel this accessibility.Children who have grown up with smartphones and tablets, for instance, tend to utilize them intuitively. Therefore, according to the Foundation, kids in third world countries will eventually be able to learn letters and numbers before even entering primary school, aided by software that adjusts to various learning speeds.The Foundation also envisions online education that better feeds into specific career paths. Whereas early efforts in the field have “amounted to little more than pointing a camera at a university lecturer and hitting the ‘record,’ button,” according to the Gates letter, new coursework would ostensibly hone in on specific professional requirements.Related: The Latest – and Unlikeliest – Man to Reinvent Online EducationPerhaps most vital to the future of education, however — especially in developing countries — is closing the gender gap. One way this can be accomplished is by putting technology in the hands of women. In Africa and South Asia, for instance, women are far less likely than men to own a cell phone.While education can be a powerful force for equality, if such pain points aren’t addressed, writes the Foundation, “then education will become another cause of inequity, rather than a cure for it.”For more predictions about how the world might look in 2030, check out the Gates letter in full right here.Related: Bill Gates’ 5 Favorite Books of 2014 Enroll Now for Freelast_img read more