first_img“Markets in the southern region remained largely unchanged from the previous year mainly due to a poorly performing labour market,” says President Gisela Janzen. “Overall B.C. northern appears to be most resilient in this post recession period when compared to the rest of the province.” In total, 4,891 properties were sold in northern B.C. in 2013, valued at $1.2 billion. That’s up from 4,696 sales the year before worth $1.08 billion. Fort St. John property sales continued to grow, with 854 properties changing hands last year, worth $289 million, compared to 825 worth $264.3 million in 2012. Along with that, the average cost for a single family residential property in this city has risen again over both 2011 and 2012, at $373,648. The average cost at the end of 2012 was 357,846. – Advertisement -However, the trend didn’t stick in Fort Nelson, where the average house price went down to $316,880 from $322,002 at the end of 2012, but is still up over 2011 prices. 88 properties were sold in 2013, worth $22.9 million, which is also down from 101 properties worth $29.2 million in the previous year. In addition, half of the 31 single family homes sold last year went for less than $290,000. There are currently 410 properties available in Fort St. John and 79 in Fort Nelson, as of December 31, 2013.Advertisementlast_img read more

first_imgThe Referendum Commission has launched a nationwide voter registration campaign in Letterkenny today (Tuesday).The campaign aims to encourage people to make sure they are registered to vote on the forthcoming referendum on the regulation of divorce which is taking place on Friday 24th May, the same day as the European Parliament and Local Government Elections.The Chairperson of the Commission Ms Justice Tara Burns visited Letterkenny today in the first event of the campaign.  She spoke to a meeting of Letterkenny IT students and distributed voter registration forms to those in need of them. The Referendum Commission will over the coming weeks be running TV, radio, online and social media advertising to urge people to check at checktheregister.ie to see if they are registered.  While the Commission’s remit covers the referendum only, being on the electoral register will allow you to vote in the referendum and the European and local elections.Chairperson of the Referendum Commission Ms Justice Tara Burns, Chayane Souza, Eunan Friel and Eimear McAleese. Photo Clive WassonMs Justice Burns said: “In order to vote, your name has to be on the register of electors for the address at which you normally live and checking if you are registered is really very simple, you can find out by checking at www.checktheregister.ie or you can also check the register in local authority offices, post offices, Garda stations and public libraries.“In this referendum we will be asked to vote on a proposal to change the Constitution of Ireland in relation to divorce.  The Constitution is the basic law in Ireland.  It can only be changed by a vote of the people.  A Constitutional Referendum, like the one on May 24th, is one of those occasions where an important decision is not taken by the Government or the Oireachtas or the courts.  Only the people get to decide.  It is your day, so make sure your voice can be heard by registering today.” Chairperson of the Referendum Commission Ms Justice Tara Burns addressedstudents at Letterkenny IT on the importance of registering to vote, and voting, inthe forthcoming referendum on the regulation of divorce on May 24 th , the same dayas the local and European elections. Photo Clive WassonShe continued: “Just 33.68% of the registered voters in Co Donegal voted in last year’s referendum on blasphemy.  This was the second lowest turnout in the country, after Dublin Central.  It is important for every county and age group to have their say, and we would urge people firstly to ensure they are registered but also to actually exercise their vote on May 24th.  If you don’t take part in the decision, then others will take the decision for you.”During her visit to Letterkenny, Ms Justice Burns also visited the home of Una Black, a Letterkenny woman who features in one of the television advertisements the Referendum Commission will be running in the coming weeks.  The Commission will be showing a series of advertisements featuring voters from around the country talking about the importance of voting.The ad featuring Ms Black can be seen here:If you find you are not registered, you can make sure you are added to the supplement to the register by completing a form which you can download from www.checktheregister.ie, or obtain from your local authority, Garda station, post office or public library.  Then you bring the completed form to your local Garda station to have your identity certified, and ensure it gets to your local authority before May 7th.People ordinarily resident at a hospital, nursing home or similar institution who are unable to vote at a polling station can vote at their hospital or nursing home, but only if they register on the Special Voters list.  The closing date for this is April 28th next and application forms are available from your local authority, library, post office, Garda station or at www.checktheregister.ieSunday April 28th is also the deadline to apply for a postal vote. These are available to certain people including Irish diplomats and their families posted abroad, members of the Garda and Defence Forces, prisoners and others who are unable to vote at their local polling station because of their occupation, service or employment. Students studying full time at an educational institution in Ireland, which is away from the home address where they are registered, can also apply. Referendum Commission Chairperson launches campaign in Donegal was last modified: April 9th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Referendum Commissionlast_img read more

first_imgSophomore quarterback Shane Purcell earned his first start of the season and came up big for Arcata High, throwing two touchdown passes in a 20-7 win over visiting Willits Saturday afternoon at the Redwood Bowl.Saturday’s win counts as Arcata’s first of the season.“Our defense played solid all night. Really, it doesn’t get much better than that,” Arcata head coach Jamal Jones said.Purcell hit Raven Perez for a 3-yard touchdown with under a minute to play in the first half, sending Arcata …last_img read more

first_img6 July 2005New immigration regulations which came into effect this month are designed to attract the foreign skills and investment necessary for South Africa’s economic growth, says Home Affairs spokesperson Nkosana Sibuyi.They also reflect South Africa’s commitment to human rights and the security of those living within the country’s borders.Sibuyi said the amended immigration regulations will discourage illegal migration, especially of people from poverty-stricken countries, by creating a wider array of permits to legalise entry.“As a country we have an obligation to regulate or facilitate movement of people, goods and services into and outside South Africa,” Sibuyi said.Relevant permits“If somebody wants to visit South Africa, he or she must have a passport and apply for a visa if so required.“A potential investor, tourist, student or diplomat should apply for a relevant permit to legalise his or her stay in the country.”Sibuyi explained that under the new regulations, if a foreigner wants to start a business, he or she is expected to apply for a business permit and should have R2.5-million to invest.Applicants without these funds must convince the government that the business will be viable in South Africa.“We need to strike a balance in terms of scarce skills,” Sibuyi said. “We must capacitate our own people first before we attract skills from foreigners, so that we get a cross-pollination of ideas to empower our country.”He said the regulations would create an enabling environment for direct foreign investment in South Africa, and attract skills needed by the country’s economy.TrainingThe new National Immigration Branch, launched in April, has trained 106 officials to control the entry, stay and departure of foreigners in the country, as regulated by the Immigration and Refugee Acts.“The training takes at least a year,” Sibuyi said. “We want our officials to understand the Act, immigration regulations and how to fill forms so that travellers do not have to go through this burden at immigration offices.“We want to ensure that people who come to the country can do so conveniently.”The new regulations also clamp down on marriages of convenience, where foreigners pay local people to marry them and then use the marriage certificates to apply for citizenship.“The amended Act makes it a requirement that any foreigner who wishes to marry a South African and thereby obtain permanent residence in the country should have a marriage in good faith to such a South African citizen for at least five years before the status can be granted to them.“This will help our fight against the problem of fraudulent marriages,” he said.Almost 2 000 marriages were recently denied legality following a department investigation into marriages of convenience.With the new regulations, students from Africa will no longer be required to pay deposits before getting study permits, provided their governments submit written undertakings to pay deportation expenses for such students should this become necessary.New costsEntry and transit visas, renewal of visitors’ permits, study permits and medical treatment permits will now cost R425.Business permits, work permits and permanent residence permits each cost R1 520. The certificate of confirmation of permanent residence is R100.The amended Act also benefits workers from neighbouring countries: they will no longer have to leave the country immediately after being retrenched or dismissed from their jobs.“Now that there so many permits, there is no need for people – especially those from neighbouring states – to come to South Africa illegally,” Sibuyi said.He said the Southern African Development Community was currently discussing free movement within member states, referring to the recent agreement between South Africa and Mozambique to waive visa requirements.RefugeesOn the question of asylum-seekers, he said South Africa was guided by United Nations policies and the African Union Convention on Refugees.“We do not expect asylum-seekers to come to here with all the required documents, because of the conflicts in their countries,” Sibuyi said. “When they come here they should go to the nearest refugee reception and apply for asylum.”Refugee smart cards printed by Home Affairs will be given to refugees.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

first_img{loadposition tc}Click on a thumbnail for a low-resolution image, or right-click on the link below it to download a high-resolution copy of the image.» Download Countryside contact sheet (1.6MB) » Download full image library contact sheet (10.5MB) Limpopo province: A new construction to monitor transport from Zimbabwe is built next to a baobab tree on the N1 freeway, north of Musina. Photo: Graeme Williams, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Limpopo province: A monument marking the position of the Tropic of Capricorn on the N1 freeway.Photo: Graeme Williams, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Hoedspruit, Limpopo province: A centre pivot irrigates a mango field at New Dawn Farm. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Hoedspruit, Limpopo province: Picking mangoes at New Dawn farm. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Hoedspruit, Limpopo province: Picking mangoes at New Dawn farm. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Hoedspruit, Limpopo province: Picking mangoes at New Dawn farm. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Hoedspruit, Limpopo province: View from an Otter Trail Balloon flight. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Hoedspruit, Limpopo province: View from an Otter Trail Balloon flight. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Hoedspruit, Limpopo province: Oranges for sale at an informal traders’ market along the roadside. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image COUNTRYSIDE 27: {loadposition cs}Having trouble downloading high-resolution images? Queries about the image library? Email Janine Erasmus at [email protected]last_img read more

first_img1 June 2011 The stalled Doha round of trade negotiations is “in intensive care” and won’t be concluded this year, although a plan B to support trade to least developed countries is on the cards, Trade and Industry Minister Rob Davies said on Monday. Addressing a media briefing in Pretoria on Monday ahead of a meeting of the World Trade Organisation (WTO) trade negotiation committee in Geneva on Tuesday, Davies said that although the bulk of WTO members were not willing to declare Doha dead, the view was that it is “in intensive care.” He added that South Africa would be a net-payer and not net beneficiary if the current Doha round were to go ahead, and that at a recent WTO ministerial meeting in Paris last week, members had decided not to set a time limit on the current Doha round. Davies said at the beginning of the year that 2011 had been defined as a “window of opportunity” to conclude the Doha round, but that this now looked unlikely, given that the year was halfway through.Smaller ‘plan B’ package mooted He said there was a sense among WTO members that carrying on as normal wouldn’t work, adding that trade ministers at a ministerial conference in December last year had mooted a plan B, part of which could be delivered by the end of the year. This would be an attempt to deliver results in a “smaller package”, but would leave out more controversial trade measures such as agriculture, services and industrial tariffs. The smaller package would include trade facilitation measures such as customs co-operation, as well as measures in export competition in agriculture, non-tariff barriers in industrial tariffs, rules about regional trade agreements and fishing subsidies, Davies said. The primary focus would be to deliver trade benefits to countries from the least developed world, he said, adding that these had been promised for delivery in 2008, but had yet to come about. This would take the shape of some form of duty-free access into economies of the developed world, such as a package of aid for trade, assisting in particular cotton growers in countries of the Sahel region, such as Burkina Faso and Chad. He said there was a perception from some WTO members that large developing nations such as India, Brazil, China as well as South Africa, should no longer be referred to as developing countries. But Davies said this was “not factual” and that even though some countries have had good gross domestic product (GDP) growth, they were effectively still developing nations.The so-called Swiss formula He said the most recent approach to the Doha trade round was the use of the so-called Swiss formula, where countries affected cuts in tariffs on products, line-by-line. But he said what was proposed by the WTO on April 21 was not enough. The idea was that after these formula cuts had been made, further cuts would be then made in the form of “sectorals” – which South Africa has viewed as voluntary cuts. But Davies, who indicated that South Africa would not be participating in any sectorals, pointed out that other WTO members had argued that unless the organisation made it compulsory for all members to make tariff cuts quid-pro-quota, there was no point in having sectorals.African free trade area South Africa, he said, would rather focus on deepening trade on the African continent and by doing so, help to open up trade to more least-developed countries. The conclusion of a grand free trade area between the Southern African Development Community (SADC), Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (Comesa) and the East African Community (EAC) would go some way to achieving this, Davies said, especially as the three communities had a combined gross domestic product of $833-billion (R5.7-trillion) and a combined population of 530-million. The three regional economic communities will hold a meeting in South Africa in less than two weeks’ time. South Africa’s membership of the Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa (BRICS) grouping also offered the African country “huge opportunities” to develop itself along a different pattern of relationships, Davies said. He said though he believes a multilateral trade system would not disappear any time soon, he believed the world was perhaps not ready at this stage to deliver a multilateral developmental round. Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

first_imgNot sure which video editing application to use? Check out this video that breaks down the differences between two of the leading contenders in pro editing – Final Cut Pro X vs. Premiere Pro.Whether you’re just now debating a jump from Final Cut Pro 7 or trying your hand at serious video editing for the first time, you may find yourself wondering which video editing application is right for your needs.Ric Lanciotti, a professor at the Pacific Northwest College of Art, has examined in detail the differences in FCPX vs Premiere Pro and then shared them in the informative video below.  Ric comes at his analysis from usage in an educational environment but many of the comparison of FCPX vs Premiere are applicable for the professional editor as well.The video runs at about :45 minutes, but for someone seriously looking at making a switch it’s time well spent.  In the end a winner is determined based on cost, features and usability (especially for users that are just getting into editing).  See for yourself the FCPX vs Premiere Pro victor… it may not be the one you would have guessed.  Thanks for sharing Ric!Best viewed full screen:last_img read more