first_img NOT LOOKING TO TAKE OVER BRIDGETOWN, Barbados (CMC): Grenada’s Prime Minister Dr Keith Mitchell says he is likely to step down as chairman of CARICOM’s sub-committee on cricket governance, stressing that he was not prepared “to play games” with the future of West Indies cricket. Mitchell has been at the forefront of spearheading efforts to effect the restructuring of the West Indies Cricket Board (WICB), and fully endorsed the recent Barriteau Report which last year recommended “the immediate dissolution” of the embattled WICB. However, with CARICOM locked in a stand-off with the WICB over the matter, Mitchell said he was fully prepared to step away from his current role and vowed that he would remain outspoken on the governance issues facing the game. “It would appear we did a poor job in communicating what has occurred so my view is that I need to step back. I have no ego to get from this. I have one interest and the regional leaders, mostly so, have one interest: the success of West Indies cricket,” Mitchell said as he delivered the 19th Sir Frank Worrell Memorial lecture at the University of the West Indies, Cave Hill campus, on Wednesday night. “I don’t know how long I will continue to chair the sub-committee because I feel so strongly about what is taking place, and as leaders, we must have the fortitude to do what is right. We cannot play games with the future of our children and grandchildren. This is too much about the future of our children and grandchildren’s generations to come.” He stressed: “I’m not playing games with it. Who wants to play games with it, that’s their business. They will have to account for it. But I tell you one thing: Whether I continue to chair this or not – and I likely will not – you will never not hear the voice of Keith Mitchell about West Indies cricket.” Mitchell also sought to debunk the idea that he and CARICOM were intent on taking over West Indies cricket. In fact, the veteran leader said not only was this not their objective, but prime ministers were not even equipped to properly run the game. He said, though, the regional nation grouping had a role to play in creating the environment for the game to prosper. “I want to make it abundantly clear again to everyone. CARICOM has no desire or intention of getting involved in the running of the day-to-day management of West Indies cricket,” Mitchell said. “We do not have the yearning or the skills to do it. Moreover, prime ministers are extremely busy people; we already have enough problems and challenges in our countries to deal with.”last_img read more

first_img“This is where I grew up so places like this are important to me,” said Alexander-Arnold to British newspaper the Daily Mail.“It’s disappointing to know this still exists because it means something isn’t right in our country.”Alexander-Arnold, 21, helps out when he has the time at St Andrew’s — a place where 25 percent of donated food comes before and after Liverpool and Everton home games.“Seeing how hard the guys here are working to make sure other people can have a hot meal over this winter period is great to see,” said Alexander-Arnold.“It inspires me to keep doing things in the community as people are suffering. Everyone in life should have a fair chance.“Places like this are not talked about enough. I would imagine there are hundreds up and down the country. They need recognition.”In fact anti-hunger campaign group the Trussell Trust runs more than 1,200 food banks nationally and handed out a record 823,145 emergency parcels, which each comprise food for three days, in the six months to September this year.That was the busiest half-year since the organisation was created in 1997 and marked a 23-percent surge from the same period of 2018.Liverpool launched their Christmas food bank appeal on Tuesday and Alexander-Arnold believes the competitive one-upmanship nature of Everton and his club’s fans will hugely benefit the St Andrew’s one.“This is a city of two great teams and the rivalry will probably help the food bank,” said Alexander-Arnold.“One set of fans doesn’t want the other one to be seen as more generous or more giving. They will be competitive about it.“That’s the way the people in the city think so hopefully St Andrew’s and the people who rely on it will benefit.”0Shares0000(Visited 11 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Local hero Trent Alexander-Arnold hasn’t forgotten his north Liverpool roots despite football fame and fortune © AFP / Paul ELLISLONDON, United Kingdom, Dec 4 – Trent Alexander-Arnold has refused to let fame and success at European champions Liverpool to forget where he came from, and is inspired to help as “people are suffering” and relying on food banks.The England full-back — who on Wednesday will help to maintain the Red’s unbeaten Premier League record in the Merseyside derby — is sad to see local people struggling as he stops by the St Andrew’s food bank in his old north Liverpool stomping ground.last_img read more

first_imgCALGARY – A defence lawyer says the world has always been pitted against two brothers with fetal alcohol syndrome who repeatedly sexually assaulted a teenage girl they randomly abducted at a bus stop.Sentencing arguments concluded Thursday for Cody and Corey Manyshots, who pleaded guilty two years ago to kidnapping, uttering threats, sexual assault and robbery.Court heard the brothers, both in their 20s, have poor cognitive function, low intelligence and mental-health issues. But that was not enough for the defence to argue they were not criminally responsible because of a mental disorder.“These two men fell through the cracks of life,” Alain Hepner, Cody’s lawyer, told the court. “They didn’t stand a chance from the minute they were born.”The pair approached a 17-year-old girl at a northeast Calgary bus stop in November 2014, forced her into an alley and sexually assaulted her.They then abducted the Grade 12 student and took her to their home, where they sexually assaulted her another 15 times until she was able to escape about eight hours later when they fell asleep.Excerpts from reports read in court suggested the brothers need to live in a structured, supervised environment to ensure their well-being and the safety of others.While a penitentiary would provide that sort of setting, everyone agreed putting the brothers behind bars indefinitely is not an option.There was discussion of what support might be available to the men after their prison terms conclude.“What more of a disability could an accused have?” provincial court Judge Terry Semenuk asked. “I’ve never seen a case like this.”Semenuk is to deliver a sentence Jan. 26.Hepner proposed about nine years in prison for his client, taking into account time already in custody.The lawyer said there is no treatment for fetal alcohol syndrome, but he hoped there is a way the brothers can get the resources they need to lead meaningful lives once their sentences end.Hepner, who said Cody does have some insight into his crime, presented a statement on behalf of his client, who cannot read.“He said he’s truly sorry for the pain he caused the young girl and he can no longer blame alcohol or drugs,” said Hepner, who added the man wants to get counselling for substance abuse.Corey’s lawyer, Mitch Stephensen, asked for a 6 1/2-year sentence, including time already spent behind bars.He said his client can barely read or write, functions at the level of a four to six year old and will become overwhelmed if given too much information at once.“Corey will not do well in treatment that he doesn’t have the mental capacity for,” said Stephensen, who cited one of the reports.“But in my respectful submission, we have to make the attempt.”The Crown had earlier proposed a 12-year sentence. Prosecutor Jonathan Hak argued the two show little empathy for the victim and there is a relatively high risk they will reoffend.Having them stay voluntarily at a residential facility following their sentence should not be considered, he added.“I think in the real world, that’s not going to happen,” Hak said.“I can’t imagine either of these offenders willing to go to a residential-type facility to live out the balance of their life.”Angelina Manyshots, the men’s mother, also addressed the court.“I really love my sons,” she said. “I’ll do everything I can to help them.”Note to readers: This is a corrected story. An earlier version had the incorrect spelling of Stephensenlast_img read more