first_imgJoey Barton took to Twitter to praise both sets of fans after QPR’s 1-0 defeat at Newcastle.Rangers’ former Magpies midfielder was given a warm welcome back to St James’ Park, where Moussa Sissoko’s goal gave the home side victory.Barton tweeted: “Gutted with the result. Felt it was a very even game. Great to be back at SJP and thanks for the reception, it meant a lot.“Also big shout to all QPR a fans who travelled up from West London. Sorry we couldn’t send you back on that long journey happier.”Barton also tweeted his support for Newcastle’s Ryan Taylor, who recently returned after a long spell out of action only to suffer another injury during the game.Barton declared: “Hope @TaylorR1984 is ok. If anyone deserves a bit of luck it’s him. #perspective .”Gutted with the result. Felt it was a very even game. Great to be back at SJP and thanks for the reception, it meant a lot.— Joseph Barton (@Joey7Barton) November 22, 2014Rangers striker Charlie Austin added: “Tough to come back from that game with nothing. Safe trip back to our fans, class today as usual.”QPR’s defeat plus Burnley’s win at Stoke meant Harry Redknapp’s side returned to the bottom of the Premier League.They now face a crucial home match against fellow strugglers Leicester next weekend.R’s defender Rio Ferdinand tweeted: “Huge game next week vs Leicester City….3points is a must…. 6pointer #cliche train hard play hard #mantra.”Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

first_imgCrescent City >> The Arcata boys and girls basketball teams swept Del Norte for important Big 5 road victories.Arcata boys beat Del Norte in low-scoring affairIt doesn’t always have to be pretty to be effective.Depending on perspective, the Del Norte Warriors and Arcata Tigers either staged a battle for the ages or a battle for the aged in their Big 5 match-up at Thunen Gymnasium in Crescent City Wednesday evening. “I think we may have set the game of basketball back about 50 …last_img read more

first_img{loadposition tc}Click on a thumbnail for a low-resolution image, or right-click on the link below it to download a high-resolution copy of the image.» Download Countryside contact sheet (1.6MB) » Download full image library contact sheet (10.5MB) Limpopo province: A new construction to monitor transport from Zimbabwe is built next to a baobab tree on the N1 freeway, north of Musina. Photo: Graeme Williams, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Limpopo province: A monument marking the position of the Tropic of Capricorn on the N1 freeway.Photo: Graeme Williams, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Hoedspruit, Limpopo province: A centre pivot irrigates a mango field at New Dawn Farm. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Hoedspruit, Limpopo province: Picking mangoes at New Dawn farm. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Hoedspruit, Limpopo province: Picking mangoes at New Dawn farm. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Hoedspruit, Limpopo province: Picking mangoes at New Dawn farm. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Hoedspruit, Limpopo province: View from an Otter Trail Balloon flight. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Hoedspruit, Limpopo province: View from an Otter Trail Balloon flight. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image Hoedspruit, Limpopo province: Oranges for sale at an informal traders’ market along the roadside. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com » Download high-res image COUNTRYSIDE 27: {loadposition cs}Having trouble downloading high-resolution images? Queries about the image library? Email Janine Erasmus at [email protected]last_img read more

first_imgThere have been – and are today – plenty of scientists and inventors in Africa doing remarkable work. So why does the myth persist that Africa has no scientific innovators? Engineering, architectural and social innovation … Chicoco Radio is a floating media platform being built with and for the residents of Port Harcourt’s waterfront community by Nigerian urbanism and architecture firm NLÉ. Read more.• African scientists make headway in grasping persistent TB bacteria• Girls in space! Africa’s first private satellite – designed by schoolgirls • How can digital technology boost growth in Africa?• Connecting women to technology• Robotic gliders boost for ocean research• Makoko Floating School: a model of Nigerian cutting-edge design Stewart Maganga, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University The rest of the world has long believed that Africa can’t produce its own scientific inventions. This myth can be traced back to the time of slavery and colonialism – systems that led even Africans themselves to think that nothing good could come from the continent.The myth is cemented by history books. These are replete with stories of scientific innovators from the developed world. I am not suggesting that the role these people played should be dismissed. They contributed enormously to the modern world.There must, however, also be room to celebrate African innovators who have not yet been recognised for their contributions to science, medicine, technology and food security. These would include biomedical engineer Selig Percy Amoils, electrochemist Rachid Yazami, nuclear scientist Sameera Moussa, palaeontologist Berhane Asfaw, surgical pioneer Haile Debas and plant geneticist Gebisa Ejeta.Today, there are plenty of African innovators who continue to do remarkable work.Zack Salawe Mwale is making it easier for people to cook one of Malawi’s staple foods.Nigerian architect Kunlé Adeyemi built a floating school for the lagoon shantytown settlement of Makoko.Togolese techie Kodjo Afate Gnikou has invented a 3D printer that costs only $100 to make, using easily sourced second-hand electronics. The 3D-printer alleviates the negative effects of E-Waste and is a game-changer for the electronics industry. (Image: Daniel Hayduk, Ulule)Gloria Asare Adu is pioneering the use of bamboo in Ghana.Thérèse Izay created a humanoid traffic robot to make the Congo’s roads safer.Jamila Abass is using cellular technology to empower small-scale farmers in Kenya.But a list of names alone will not bust this myth.Building more young scientistsAfrica needs to start demonstrating to the world that it is capable of producing its own innovators.It can do this in two ways. First, by investing in the continent’s youth. Second, by creating opportunities for the new generation of African inventors and innovators to take their place on the global stage.Africa is home to the world’s largest population of 15- to 24-year-olds. This is set to double by 2045. African governments have recognised that, to build a sustainable future, they must equip their populations with the skills needed to build the continent from within – rather than relying on technologies and ideas from elsewhere.Work is already being done in this regard. In 2005 the African Youth Forum for Science and Technology programme was launched to give young African people a platform on which they can actively play a role in policy and decision-making. Another initiative is the South African Agency for Science and Technology Advancement. The agency gives young graduates the chance to get involved in advancing science and technology.Far more of these initiatives are needed to motivate young people in Africa to take the promise of science and technology seriously. Only then will the continent start to recognise its own potential in these fields.Universities lag behindMost African governments recognise that the only way forward is through homegrown science and technology. But many universities aren’t keeping pace.Research suggests that more and more African graduates want to work for themselves and are committed to changing their societies. This also suggests that many are innovators at heart. Yet neither their schools nor their universities appear to be equipping them for life as inventors or self-starters.These concerns have been raised by both scholars and educators. Bame Nsamenang and Therese Tchombe, for example, argue that the current African education system does not seem to reflect the realities on the ground. The system needs to be altered so that it is in tune with these realities – and so that it teaches children just how much people in Africa are able to do to address their own continent’s problems.It is also important that schools and universities in Africa not only highlight and idealise theories and thinkers from elsewhere in the world. This will help their graduates see what is possible and stop thinking of their continent as a place without innovators.Some institutions are setting the pace here. South Africa’s University of the Western Cape is offering a flagship programme on Critical Thought in African Humanities through its Centre for Humanities Research.The Pan-African University, which is being established by the African Union Commission, is another example. It aims to prioritise science, technology and innovative research that’s uniquely African, and to highlight the work coming out of the continent.Such work is an important start towards Africa recognising its own potential and hailing its own homegrown innovators. There need to be far more of these sorts of initiatives – because as long as the continent fails to recognise that the myth of itself as not innovative is just that, a myth, Africa can’t really move forward.Stewart Maganga is a doctoral candidate at the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University. A version of this article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original.Compiled by Mary Alexanderlast_img read more

first_imgThe bypoll in three Assembly constituencies of western Uttar Pradesh saw a mixed response from the voters on Monday. While Gangoh clocked the highest turnout at 60%, Iglas (reserved) constituency in Aligarh district scored a poor 36.2% and Rampur Sadar saw a voting percentage of 44. Some villages of Iglas boycotted the election for a major part of the day, raising the slogan “vikas nahin, vote nahin” (no development, no vote). Local sources said villagers were asking for all-weather roads in their area.It was only after 3 p.m. that the voters turned up at the booths after repeated assurances from the administration and Hathras MP and former MLA Rajvir Singh Diler of the BJP. The seat got vacant after Mr. Diler was elected to the Lok Sabha.“There was no complete boycott in any of the villages but the voting percentage was very poor in Nawalpur, Kapoor Khera and Udambara villages of Iglas. We have noted their demands and the administration will work towards it,” said Anjani Kumar, Sub-Divisional Magistrate, Iglas. Unlike other constituencies, in Rampur, the BJP is the challenger as it tries to take on Tanzeen Fatima, Rajya Sabha member, and wife of Samajwadi Party heavyweight Azam Khan in Mr. Khan’s pocket borough. The bypoll was necessitated when Mr. Khan got elected to the Lok Sabha earlier this year after defeating his arch-rival Jaya Prada in a volatile contest. Local sources say the poor voting percentage will help the BJP candidate Bharat Bhushan Gupta. “Also, there is a section of Muslims who are voting for the BJP this time,” said Hasnat Ali Khan, a former Samajwadi Party member.Cong.-BJP contestIn Gangoh (Saharanpur), another constituency with a significant Muslim population along with a sizeable Dalit electorate, the contest seems to be between the BJP and the Congress. Here the BJP has fielded Kirat Singh, the general secretary of the local BJP unit against Nauman Masood, chairman of Gangoh Municipal Corporation and brother of firebrand Congress leader Imran Masood.Mr. Masood has a tough task as the BSP’s Mohd Irshad and SP’s Indrasen are expected to cut into Muslim, Jatav and Gujjar votes.last_img read more