first_imgTony Fernandes paid tribute to Jimmy Floyd Hasselbaink after QPR’s dramatic 2-1 victory at Fulham.Rangers’ win at Craven Cottage was their first since 1980 and came days after allegations that manager Hasselbaink sought £55,000 to work for a company looking to sell players to the club.Rangers say they are holding an internal investigation into the allegations. Fernandes also praised Rangers fans in a post on Instagram after the match.Meanwhile, jubilant Rangers players posted on Twitter after their victory.What a win!!! @MassLuongo 🍒#FULQPR pic.twitter.com/v2FAJBPoKp— Tjaronn Chery (@tjaronnchery) October 1, 2016What a game! 💪🏼💪🏼💪🏼 West London derby winners! Great team performance today! 🔵⚪ #FULQPR #COYRS #QPR @QPRFC pic.twitter.com/XTmu8Dp0GR— Sebastian Polter (@polti1991) October 1, 2016The most important in West London derby is?? The Victory @QPRFC #FULQPR #COYRS #assist @tjaronnchery ⚽️ pic.twitter.com/40z4hEEJXu— Idrissa Sylla (@IdrissaSylla40) October 1, 2016 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

first_imgA fossil Cambrian arthropod shows a large complex brain, prompting evolutionists to propose that evolution ran backwards from there.“Complex brains evolved much earlier than previously thought, 520-million-year-old fossilized arthropod confirms” is how PhysOrg headlined a press release from University of Arizona that found “remarkably well-preserved brain structures” in a fossil from China.  A similar headline is found on Science Daily:  “Cambrian Fossil Pushes Back Evolution of Complex Brains.”  Science Now announced, “Spider ancestor had big brain.”  The press release continued the un-Darwinian refrain:The remarkably well-preserved fossil of an extinct arthropod shows that anatomically complex brains evolved earlier than previously thought and have changed little over the course of evolution. According to University of Arizona neurobiologist Nicholas Strausfeld, who co-authored the study describing the specimen, the fossil is the earliest known to show a brain.Cambrian arthropods, including trilobites, clearly had brains, but this one preserved the imprint of soft brain matter so clearly that scientists were able to trace the neural pathways from the brain to the eye stalks.  The press release states that it “represents an extinct lineage of arthropods combining an advanced brain anatomy with a primitive body plan.”  They must mean “primitive” with respect to age on the evolutionary timeline, else why would a “primitive” animal need a complex brain?  One of the researchers, Nicholas Strausfeld, said, “In principle, Fuxianhuia‘s is a very modern brain in an ancient animal.”  Live Science suggested “primitive” equates with “simple” – “The rest of the animal is incredibly simple, so it’s a big surprise to see a brain that is so advanced, as it were, in such a simple animal,” Strausfeld told Live Science.In the press release, Stausfeld, a neurobiologist at the University of Arizona, made other statements that run counter to evolutionary expectations, even though he assumed the brain evolved:The fossil supports the idea that once a basic brain design had evolved, it changed little over time, he explained. Instead, peripheral components such as the eyes, the antennae and other appendages, sensory organs, etc., underwent great diversification and specialized in different tasks but all plugged into the same basic circuitry.“It is remarkable how constant the ground pattern of the nervous system has remained for probably more than 550 million years,” Strausfeld added. “The basic organization of the computational circuitry that deals, say, with smelling, appears to be the same as the one that deals with vision, or mechanical sensation.”Another evolutionary expectation was shattered by this fossil.  Fuxianhuia protensa is a malacostracan, a group with complex brains, including crabs and shrimp.  Evolutionists preferred to believe that insects evolved from simpler-brained branchiopods (including brine shrimp).  The discovery of a complex brain deep in the Cambrian explosion shatters not only that expectation but turns evolution backwards:Because the brain anatomy of branchiopods is much simpler than that of malacostracans, they have been regarded as the more likely ancestors of the arthropod lineage that would give rise to insects.However, the discovery of a complex brain anatomy in an otherwise primitive organism such as Fuxianhuia makes this scenario unlikely. “The shape [of the fossilized brain] matches that of a comparable sized modern malacostracan,” the authors write in Nature. They argue the fossil supports the hypothesis that branchiopod brains evolved from a previously complex to a more simple architecture instead of the other way around.The paper in Nature by Stausfeld, a Londoner and two Chinese colleagues stated that “early-diverging arthropods have scarcely been analysed in the context of nervous system evolution.”  This was, therefore, the first and clearest opportunity to analyze it with Fuxianhuia, “exhibiting the most compelling neuroanatomy known from the Cambrian.”  The authors had to make the astounding claim that later branchiopods underwent an “evolutionary reduction” in brain structure instead of the progressive increase as would have been expected.  “The early origin of sophisticated brains provides a probable driver for versatile visual behaviours, a view that accords with compound eyes from the early Cambrian that were, in size and resolution, equal to those of modern insects and malacostracans,” the abstract stated. (Ma, Hou, Edgecomb and Strausfed, “Complex brain and optic lobes in an early Cambrian arthropod,” Nature 490, 11 Oct 2012, pp. 258–261, doi:10.1038/nature11495.)However they sliced it, the authors had to conclude that “the brain and optic lobes of Fuxianhuia suggest that the arthropod nervous system acquired complexity by the early Cambrian.”  The editor’s summary of the paper stated again what this fossil means for evolutionary theory:The Cambrian explosion refers to a time around 530 million years ago, when animals with modern features first appeared in the fossil record. The fossils of Cambrian arthropods reveal sophisticated sense organs such as compound eyes, but other parts of the nervous system are usually lost to decay before fossilization. This paper describes an exquisitely preserved brain in an early arthropod from China, complete with antennal nerves, optic tract and optic neuropils very much like those of modern insects and crustaceans. This suggests that if insects evolved from quite simple creatures such as branchiopod shrimps, then modern branchiopods have undergone a drastic reduction in the complexity of their nervous systems.The authors found about 50 specimens in various orientations, leading them to infer that “the eye stalk assemblage possessed a considerable degree of rotational freedom and thus allowed active vision“.  The preservation was so remarkable that they were easily able to compare structures with those from living malacostracans, insects and chilopods, each group having a similar tripartite brain.  “Indeed, it is expected that optic lobes would have already evolved sophisticated circuits even more deeply in the arthropod stem-group, enabling high-level visual processing of the kind presumed to be associated with large compound eyes belonging to the stem-group arthropod Anomalocaris.”Spin DoctoringIn the same issue of Nature, Graham E. Budd tried to rescue evolution from this evidence, using the worn-out cliche that the fossil “may shed new light” on how brain tissues evolved.  His opening paragraph is a masterpiece of spin doctoring, listing various unexpected fossil surprises as triumphs for evolution:Even to palaeontologists, the fossil record can resemble the chaotic attic of an eccentric relative, stacked with ancient bric-a-brac of dubious usefulness. But the record has recently been throwing up some surprises that are bringing new order to this jumble. Our concept of dinosaurs, for example, has evolved from what were essentially bolted-together lumps of bone into living creatures covered in graceful feathers — and in colour too. Other fossil finds have brought changes to the scale of our understanding of evolution. For example, the discovery of exceptionally well-preserved fossil muscle fibres throughout the record and fossilized embryos from at least the Cambrian period, some 500 million years ago, have provided remarkable insight into the fine-scale evolution of these tissues and life stages. Now, on page 258 of this issue, Ma and colleagues describe preserved nervous tissue from the Cambrian — a find that grants palaeontologists access to the exclusive zoological club of those who study the brain and nervous system.None of these “surprises” were anticipated by evolutionists, yet Budd described them all as providing “insight into the fine-scale evolution” of life stages.  But clearly, in his own words, the only thing that has “evolved” is their “concept” of how evolution works.  How complex muscle fibers and embryos from the earliest parts of the record could provide “insight” into evolution was left unexplained.  His reference to dinosaurs covered in colorful feathers is also dubious.From there, Budd disputed the authors’ claim that complex brains appeared early in the arthropod lineage.  His alternative?  “Convergent evolution” (see 10/08/2012) or else a grab bag of rearrangement options:However, there are two potential alternatives to this far-reaching conclusion. It is possible that the arrangement in Fuxianhuia is convergent to that in the modern crustaceans or insects; in other words, similar brain assemblies to that reported for Fuxianhuia evolved again in later arthropods. Or it may be that we need to rethink the systematic position of Fuxianhuia. That latter option would entail a substantial rearrangement of our present understanding of early arthropod evolution — not least in the highly vexed issue of the ‘great appendage problem’. This refers to the controversial identity of a large anterior appendage found in many Cambrian arthropods, and seemingly also in the Fuxianhuia specimen described here. Discovering which part of the brain this structure is innervated from will add vital information to this debate. Either way, Ma and colleagues’ findings will prompt hasty re-examination of many old specimens, and quite possibly some recasting of recent theories.(Graham E. Budd, “Palaeontology: Cambrian nervous wrecks,” Nature 490, 11 October 2012, pp. 180–181, doi:10.1038/490180a.)We want to help our buddy Budd recast some recent theories without having to do any hasty re-examination of old specimens.  Appealing to the fossil evidence, we point out abrupt appearance of all the animal body plans in the Cambrian explosion, with complex brains evident in the early Cambrian and no transitional forms.  From there, diversification and simplification occurs according to built-in variability and adaptation mechanisms, but the original complex designs endure.  This theory of descent is known as intelligent design.  Reference: Darwin’s Dilemma. (Visited 66 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

first_img The SASSI programme’s prominent online presence has also made it easy for consumers to participate. Consumers can obtain the most up-to-date information at any time on the SASSI website, FishMS and mobi site. The FishMS service allows consumers to access the SASSI seafood database from any mobile phone. Consumers can send a text message to the number 079 499 8795 to find out whether a particular species is on the red, orange or green list. According to Petersen, the response from wholesalers and retailers to consumer pressure has also been encouraging. A growing number of participants at this end of the value chain are actively involved with the SFP. Quarterly assessments are carried out with each partner to evaluate their seafood procurement process and raise awareness amongst staff. The programme is working with 11 of the biggest seafood suppliers in South Africa (such as Aquatic Foods and Fish On Line), the large retailers (Pick n Pay, Woolworths, Spar) and popular restaurant chains such as John Dory’s and Ocean Basket. Offshore and inshore commercial industry players, such as I&J and Sea Harvest, are also involved.Fish stocks recovering Petersen said in a statement that kingklip stocks almost collapsed a few years ago. However, because of consumer pressure many restaurants stopped offering it on the menu and retailers no longer kept it in stock. Catch limits were also introduced and the kingklip spawning site near Port Elizabeth in the Eastern Cape was placed under protection. “I really hope to see kingklip on the green list one day soon.” Basson says that some of South Africa’s linefish species are also showing signs of recovery. For example, red roman, a member of the seabream family, is a popular linefish species that is endemic to Southern Africa. It is a reef-associated species with a relatively narrow distribution from Namibia to the Eastern Cape. She says it is a slow growth species – a 40cm fish could be as old as 40 years. They achieve late sexual maturity and change sex from female to male as they mature. These factors make them highly vulnerable to overfishing. Red roman stocks are in urgent need of rebuilding as they have almost disappeared in some areas such as False Bay on the southern Cape coast. However, she says that there is evidence of recovery within Marine Protected Areas (MPA) along the coast. Research has shown a 90% increase in catches of red roman within the Goukamma MPA. Goukamma is situated on the Garden Route on the Cape South Coast. The exclusion of fishing boats from Goukamma has also been beneficial. “Although much remains to be done to get the red roman stock back to its former glory, this still indicates the tremendous value of MPAs in rebuilding the breeding stock of important over-exploited linefish species,” says Basson.SA consumers more environmentally aware Consumers are becoming more aware of issues affecting the environment. “South African consumers are one of the main reasons why SASSI has been so successful and why we have seen some of our fish species recover,” Basson says. Another success story is that of the South African hake trawl fishery. Significant progress has been made in the management of the hake resource, as a result of both Marine Stewardship Council certification and consumer pressure. If consumers continue to ask questions, it will have major positive impacts for the entire seafood industry. First published by MediaClubSouthAfrica.com – get free high-resolution photos and professional feature articles from Brand South Africa’s media service. 1 October 2010 Thanks to South African consumers, the demand for over-exploited fish stocks is declining. Increasing consumer pressure on seafood retailers to stock sustainably harvested fish and support eco-friendly fishing methods have caused stocks of species such as kingklip to show signs of recovery. The Southern African Sustainable Seafood Initiative (SASSI) was launched six years ago to involve the entire seafood supply chain, including consumers, in creating a sustainable seafood industry. Today this initiative has proven to be a highly successful South African consumer campaign. The ocean has often been viewed as an “infinite resource”, but buy-in from the public is helping to correct this perception. Janine Basson from the Sustainable Fisheries Programme (SFP): Fisher and Consumer Outreach, says the SASSI programme has been so successful to date because consumers feel empowered. Their choices can drive positive change towards the recovery of fish stocks. “Consumers are given the opportunity to make informed choices when choosing which seafood to buy and eat. People want to be part of the solution to overfishing, and SASSI is a tool that allows them to do that,” Basson says. There are other seafood campaigns globally that are doing similar work. However, Basson says the major difference is that other international programmes do not partner with seafood industry players, whereas the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) South Africa is partnering with industry. This is a key strength of the programme.Finding solutions together A number of programmes are jointly finding solutions to the problem of overfishing and declining fish stocks. The SFP forms part of the WWF Sanlam Living Waters partnership, an initiative to promote marine conservation in South Africa. The SFP works across the seafood supply chain to address ecosystem overexploitation. It contributes to two of the partnership’s targets for the marine sector – firstly, to apply an ecosystem approach to fisheries in South Africa and reduce the impacts of destructive fishing practices to acceptable levels. Its other goal is to restore at least half of over-exploited fish stocks to sustainably managed levels, while still maintaining or improving the state of other stocks. The SFP aims to meet these targets through activities that focus on how fish are caught and traded. The Responsible Fisheries Programme works directly with the fishing industry and resource management and addresses how fish are caught. SASSI focuses on the trading aspect, which involves retailers, restaurants, chefs and consumers.Consumers asking the right questions Dr Samantha Petersen, project manager of the SFP, said in a statement that consumers must continue asking restaurants and retailers if they serve or sell sustainably harvested fish and seafood. Some fishing and seafood farming methods pose more harm to the environment than others. For instance, Basson says, line- or pole-caught methods are relatively selective and don’t kill unintended species such as seabirds and sharks. Although some forms of seafood farming can reduce pressure on overexploited wild stocks, this is only the case if wild fish don’t have to be fed to farmed fish, or if the production method doesn’t further degrade the environment. Consumers must not hesitate to ask in-depth questions about seafood and find out what they are buying or eating, where it comes from and how it was caught. Research indicates that positive changes at sea have predominantly resulted from consumer queries. “One consumer who asks questions about the sustainability of their seafood is likely to have a bigger influence than 100 who simply make a green choice without telling the restaurant or retailer why,” Basson says. Major success has also been achieved with SASSI’s progressive consumer tools. The SASSI Consumer Pocket Guide, originally drafted in 2005, uses a three-level colour classification to rate fish. Green indicates best choice while orange suggests caution and red means the species is illegal or classified as a “no sale species”. Certain species such as tuna were categorised in the green group, but this did not take the fishing method into account. The original red group only included the species that are prohibited from being sold by law.Get the SASSI list The new and updated SASSI list includes a revision of a number of species included on the original list. The new red group lists unsustainable species along with those that are illegal to sell in South Africa. Basson says the original list excluded important imported and aquaculture species, but the updated version includes a selection of these species. “This was becoming an increasingly pressing need due to the growing South African aquaculture industry,” she says. Download the pocket-sized version of the SASSI list (PDF, 1.25MB)last_img read more

first_imgMrs Mpumalanga second runner-up 2017 – Lucia Ochan, is playing her part whilst in the running for the prestigious crown of Mrs Africa 2019. As a prominent businesswoman, founder and patron of the Lucia O Foundation. Mrs Ochan is making strides towards a better future for all in her community, this through her Emphakatsi – INdlovukati (She Elephant) – Women in leadership and rural women empowerment series project.The project will be launched in partnership with rural women in order to uplift, empower and develop the community positively.“The reality is that many rural people are rendered second-class citizens in their own countries,” said Ochan, adding, “They are often far removed from urban economic nodes and live under extreme measures of poverty often without basic amenities such as clean drinkable water, sanitation, housing, electricity, schools, etc.” The launch will consist of a Creative Masterclass for upcoming young fashion designers (youths between the ages of 18-26) in the morning and provide insights into the clothing, textile and jewellery industry. Brand South Africa through its Constitution awareness programme, fully supports initiatives that seek to ensure that the values enshrined in the widely admire constitution, are indeed a lived experience by all parts of our society. “Through our Play Your Part programme, Brand South Africa pursues to celebrate those amongst the community who take it upon themselves to initiate positive social change. We hope this programme inspires other members of the community to get involved and ensure young people can be fully engaged in their right to education”, said Brand South Africa’s Stakeholder Relations Manager; Ms Toni Gumede. Programme and Details: Date: 15 November 2018Venue: Nutting House, MbombelaTime: 11h00 – 15h00last_img read more

18 Dec / 2019

Andy Rodefer, Oct. 12

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest It has been pretty dry here. We are hoping to finish up soybeans today. We haven’t touched any corn yet. We just keep hammering on these beans. We have 130 acres of beans to go and we’ll switch to corn.Yields have been pretty steady with a range of 45 to about 70 bushels depending on the field and the water damage. We are seeing a lot of the water damage on some of our better fields but the yields are still hanging out around 60 or better. We are pretty satisfied with that.I hand shelled some corn last week. It was 109-day maturity and it was around 19% moisture. At the elevator they are saying everything is from 17% to 25% moisture in the last week. Corn yields in the area have been 100 bushels an acre on up to 230 and 240. Corn will have a lot of variation across the field.We have been doing fall herbicide applications the last couple of years and that really helps with the marestail. This year, though, we are more concerned with compaction than weed pressure. We did some deep chiseling and we ran our vertical-till disk on some acres. We have a good start on that and we are going to try to get more tillage done this fall than we normally would. We are definitely ahead of schedule.There have been a lot of combine fires in this area because everything has been so dry and dusty. Everybody needs to stay safe and make sure their fire extinguishers are working. You never know when something like that is going to happen. There have been more fires this year then there have been in the past.last_img read more

first_imgshant peppered the England bowlers with short-pitched deliveries and it did the trick for India.Pacer Ishant Sharma’s career best seven for 74 bounced out England to give India a historic 95-run victory, their first in 28 years at Lord’s, in the second cricket Test on Monday.Set a target of 319, England were bowled out for 223 runs in their second innings, a little over an hour before tea on the final day as India took a 1-0 lead in the five-match series.Read: India register historic Test win at Lord’sCuriously, England could not get as many as they scored in the first innings (319) to win the match. India riding on a fine century by Ajinkya Rahane (103) had scored 295 in the first innings and 342 in the second innings, reported IANS.The 25-year-old Ishant, who went wicketless in the first innings, used the short-ball well to his advantage as Joe Root (66), Moeen Ali (39), Matt Prior (12), Ben Stokes and Stuart Broad (8) all fell to short-pitched deliveries on the final day. Ishant was adjudged the Man of the Match.Resuming at 105 for four on the fifth morning, England had a daunting challenge at hand to save the Test match. Root and Moeen frustrated the Indian bowlers in the first session but at the stroke of lunch Ishant struck to remove Moeen and tilt the scales in India’s favour. Moeen was completely taken aback by a short pitched delivery that rose sharply and he took his eyes off and gloved it to Cheteshwar Pujara at short-leg.advertisementThe 101-run stand for the fifth wicket between Root and Moeen helped England to recover from a precarious 72 for four. But with Moeen’s dismissal, India sensed victory and piled the pressure on the hosts.In the post-lunch session, Ishant peppered the England bowlers with short-pitched deliveries and it did the trick for India. Prior found Murali Vijay at deep mid-wicket while attempting a pull in 80th over.Stokes continued his poor run as he fell for his fourth consecutive duck while attempting a pull and two balls later Root found Stuart Binny at deep square leg in a similar fashion. It was just a co-incidence that Binny’s father Roger, now a national selector, also featured in the last win at Lord’s in 1986 under the captaincy of Kapil Dev.With score at 201/8, the writing was on the wall for England and this time India were not ready to let loose the tailenders. Ishant again used the short-ball cleverly — and this time it was Broad, who attempting to trickle it down the leg-side, gloved to Mahendra Singh Dhoni.For Ravindra Jadeja it was like sweet revenge as he ran out James Anderson (2) to finish off a memorable win for India.last_img read more