first_imgSameer Africa Limited (SAMEER.ke) listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchange under the Industrial holding sector has released it’s 2014 annual report.For more information about Sameer Africa Limited (SAMEER.ke) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Sameer Africa Limited (SAMEER.ke) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Sameer Africa Limited (SAMEER.ke)  2014 annual report.Company ProfileSameer Africa Limited manufactures and imports tyres and automotive products and sells them through distribution outlets in Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Rwanda and Burundi. Products in its range sold under the Yana brand name include passenger textile and steel-belted radials, light truck radial and bias and tyres for trucks, buses, agricultural, industrial and off-road vehicles. Sameer Africa also produce a range of tube and tubeless tyres as well as flaps which are sold under the Bridgestone brand. It services the retail sector, large fleets and government sectors through wholly-owned and branded tyre centres found in the major towns and cities of Kenya. Sameer Africa has interests in property investment and manages a property letting agency. Formerly known as Firestone East Africa (1969), the company changed its name to Sameer Africa Limited in 2005. Sameer Africa Limited is a subsidiary of Sameer Investments Limited. Its head office is in Nairobi, Kenya. Sameer Africa Limited is listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchangelast_img read more

first_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit an Event Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Tags People, Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Knoxville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET April 28, 2015 at 11:02 pm Noreen, follow the link (highlighted Bane in 2nd paragraph) to answer your questions. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET May 1, 2015 at 12:42 pm To Bishop Bane we say The Episcopal Church Welcomes You again!!! Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest LTC Gene Moser says: [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs press release] Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori has restored the Rt. Rev. David Bane to ordained ministry in The Episcopal Church.As such, he returns to The Episcopal Church as a bishop and is a member of the House of Bishops. The Presiding Bishop took this action following a request from Bane and in consultation with her Council of Advice and with Bishop Robert Skirving of the Diocese of East Carolina.The restoration took effect April 8 and was celebrated at an April 27 service of reconciliation with Bishop Skirving in the Diocese of East Carolina.The notice signed by the Presiding Bishop, called Restoration to Ordained Ministry, reads as such:Upon retraction of his Renunciation of Ordained Ministry in this Church made to me in writing on March 21, 2015, and his execution of the Declaration of Conformity prescribed by Article VIII of the Constitution of The Episcopal Church, and with the advice and consent of the Advisory Council to the Presiding Bishop, I have rescinded the Declaration of Removal and Release from the Ordained Ministry of this Church, executed by me on May 22, 2009, of The Right Rev. David C. Bane, Bishop of Southern Virginia, Resigned, who is, therefore, restored to the Ordained Ministry of this Church, with the attendant obligations of Ministerial office, and endowed with the right to exercise the gifts and spiritual authority as a Minister of God’s Word and Sacraments in this Church conferred on him in Ordinations. Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Presiding Bishop restores David Bane to ordained ministry Richard McClellan says: DEE W. BRIGHT, SR. says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Press Release Service Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH May 4, 2015 at 12:01 pm We cannot talk about reconciliation with Bane when at the same time we are inhibiting and deposing the (now) former Suffragan Bishop of Maryland. By his own actions and with his own voice, Bane made misguided, destructive and heretical statements about the Episcopal Church. He abandoned the Communion. Cook, the former Suffragan in Maryland, made a tragic, but human mistake. She is deserving of whatever justice and consequences that comes her way, but she has not abandoned the Communion.Having come to his senses, Bane is certainly welcome in our church. He should not, however, have been re-instated as a bishop. I hope his personal epiphany is based in the Holy Spirit and not the Church Pension Group. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA center_img Submit a Job Listing July 2, 2015 at 5:51 pm Bane did extreme damage to the Diocese of Southern Virginia. I can see welcoming him back to the church and even the priesthood, but not the bishopric. Featured Jobs & Calls C.M. Turner says: Rector Albany, NY Posted Apr 28, 2015 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Bath, NC Rector Smithfield, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Music Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Comments are closed. Rector Tampa, FL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Brian Turner says: Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN Comments (5) New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books May 3, 2015 at 11:42 am Welcome back! Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Hopkinsville, KY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AKlast_img read more

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL By David PaulsenPosted Apr 15, 2020 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 All Saints Episcopal Church in Tarpon Springs, Florida, is among the congregations across the United States applying for loans through the Paycheck Protection Program included in the federal stimulus package known as the CARES Act. Photo: All Saints[Episcopal News Service] It may not have merited a single mention in the online video of your socially distanced Easter Sunday service this year, but behind the scenes – before, during and after Holy Week – the federal CARES Act has been and continues to be a big deal for churches.Much of the $2 trillion stimulus package that became law on March 27 is intended as a lifeline for private sector employers and workers, but The Episcopal Church and other tax-exempt faith-based organizations also qualify for emergency federal assistance amid the sudden economic downturn caused by the rapid spread of COVID-19. Finances at congregations of all sizes also have been disrupted by widespread prohibitions on public gatherings.“Let’s face it, this is going to affect everybody to some extent. It just depends on what kind of condition you’re in,” said the Rev. Bob Kinney, who serves as a deacon and business manager at All Saints Episcopal Church in Tarpon Springs on Florida’s Gulf Coast.Kinney sits on the lowest rung of a ladder of churchwide mobilization. The CARES Act, formally known as the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act, allotted $350 billion for loans to employers through its Paycheck Protection Program. In addition to payroll costs, the money can be used to cover utility bills and mortgage or lease payments for up to two months. All Saints applied for a $27,600 loan.Up one rung on the churchwide ladder, the Diocese of Southwest Florida has been in regular communication with its 77 churches and two church plants about their financial options. As the coronavirus crisis has developed, the diocesan financial team, led by Ann Vickers, canon for finance and administration, has organized weekly webinars with priests and parish administrators. Vickers’ advice has included how to apply for federal assistance. All Saints and 69 other churches in the diocese are doing so.The CARES Act allows them to request loans worth up to 2½ months’ personnel costs. Across the diocese, those requests total more than $6 million covering about 735 jobs – including the 38 people who work for the diocese and for the diocese’s DaySpring Episcopal Conference Center in Parrish, Florida.The abrupt shift last month to online worship services has deprived churches of the ability to collect traditional plate offerings, though pledges have continued to come in through websites and by mail. Within those constraints, some Southwest Florida churches’ financial outlooks are better than others, Vickers told Episcopal News Service.Their cash reserves vary, as do their parishioners’ financial statuses, she said. Many congregations hadn’t attempted to collect digital offerings and donations until now, when it became imperative. With much of the economy shut down and more than 16 million people nationwide filing unemployment claims in the past month, churches and their parishioners may face financial disruptions for quite some time.“No one yet has seen the end or even the middle of what we’re going to witness regarding financial [impact],” Vickers said.One more step up the ladder, Episcopal agencies and churchwide staff are working to extend some financial relief to dioceses and parishes while also ensuring that church leaders have the latest guidance on CARES Act implementation.Presiding Bishop Michael Curry on March 17 assured dioceses “we will work with you” if assessment payments need to be rescheduled. Church Pension Group is waiving some parishes’ pension obligations for two months. The Episcopal Church’s Washington, D.C.-based Office of Government Relations advocated at the congressional level for passage of the CARES Act, and the Episcopal Church Foundation followed up with an informational CARES Act webinar featuring a panel of experts. The discussion has since been posted on its website.One stumbling block along the way involved confusion over whether churches were covered by the CARES Act’s Paycheck Protection Program since they are not required to obtain the same tax-exempt certifications as other nonprofits. Episcopal leaders on all rungs of the ladder shared updates and suggestions with each other as they pressed for and awaited clarification. Late on April 3, the Small Business Administration, or SBA, which oversees the program, issued guidelines that confirmed churches were covered.Vickers shared with ENS part of an email chain in which diocesan and churchwide administrators and attorneys tracked those developments. In some cases, she said, church officials in Southwest Florida were the ones informing their lenders of the SBA’s clarification.“That is an especially astounding example of the coordination of The Episcopal Church from all levels,” Vickers said.Loan application pending for DFMS’ churchwide staff costsOfficials with the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, or DFMS, The Episcopal Church’s legal and corporate entity, have been active both in those conversations and in finalizing DFMS’ own application for assistance under the Paycheck Protection Program.The program’s loans are available to employers with staffs of 500 or fewer, to help those employers keep money flowing in the short term. After two months, the loans can be converted to grants if churches and other participating employers meet certain criteria, such as maintaining staffing levels.With a churchwide staff of 152, the DFMS applied for a $3 million loan.“It is very likely that income to the DFMS will be sharply curtailed for the remainder of 2020,” Kurt Barnes, the church’s treasurer and chief financial officer, said in a March 27 memo to department heads. “The cancellation of physical worship services during Lent, Easter and thereafter will affect parish and diocesan income, which, in turn, will affect the ability of dioceses to fulfill pledges to the churchwide budget.”Dioceses are required by church Canons to contribute 15% of their incomes as assessments to The Episcopal Church to support a range of churchwide ministries, from evangelism and church planting to caring for creation and racial reconciliation. Paid in full, those assessments would total nearly $90 million of the church’s revised $137 million budget for 2019-2021.“While we cannot control that income, we can control expenses,” Barnes said in his memo, which advocated a 20% reduction in overall DFMS spending this year. Staff costs make up 44% of churchwide spending, so to maintain current staffing levels, departments were asked to cut about 35% in non-staff budget items, such as travel expenses.Barnes told ENS in a phone interview that receiving a CARES Act loan could help stabilize the income side of the equation. As of April 14, the DFMS’ loan still was being reviewed for final approval by the SBA.With a deep recession all but certain due to the coronavirus – possibly the worst since the Great Depression – this moment defies recent historical comparisons, Barnes said. It also is too soon to say what long-term effect the economy and disruptions to normal parish life will have on the church’s finances, but Barnes expects to have a better picture by August, when his staff and the church’s Executive Council will begin developing the church’s 2021 budget.As congregations face churchwide disruptions, local contexts varyBalancing a church budget is both an art and a science for Kinney. While his job is to tally the income and expenses at All Saints in Tarpon Springs, as a church member for about 20 years, he also knows how the congregation “has behaved over time.”Kinney knows that contributions from seasonal visitors make a difference in the Sunday offering this time of year. With in-person worship suspended, “our open plate offering is almost nonexistent,” he said in an interview with ENS.He knows that many of the parish’s year-round worshippers are retirees and they aren’t as directly affected by the economy as working-age parishioners. Typical Sunday attendance was about 120 before the crisis. Pledge income has remained steady, he said, and he is optimistic about the church’s short-term finances.“I worry about it,” Kinney said, “but frankly, with our congregation, we’ve seen some drop-off but not nearly as dramatic as I thought it might be.” He has remained only mildly concerned even after Gov. Ron DeSantis on April 1 issued a “stay at home” order for the state, one of the last states to enact such a policy.Kinney’s cautious optimism is shared by the Rev. Eric Cooter, rector of St. Monica’s Episcopal Church in Naples, Florida, about three hours south of All Saints along the coast. The church’s treasurer and comptroller carefully manage cashflow under normal conditions, and that has helped St. Monica’s respond to coronavirus disruptions, Cooter told ENS.The Rev. Eric Cooter presides at the online Palm Sunday service April 5 at St. Monica’s Episcopal Church in Naples, Florida. Photo: St. Monica’s via YouTubeThe church normally draws up to 250 worshippers across four weekend services, Cooter said. With worship now exclusively online, viewership numbers have been promising – about 400 for the Palm Sunday service, he said – but the normal pledge income of more than $5,000 a week dwindled to less than half that in the first weeks after in-person worship was suspended.Since then, pledge income appears to have returned to normal levels, Cooter said. Even so, St. Monica’s applied for a CARES Act loan to help maintain the congregation’s staff of 13 part-time and full-time employees.“I don’t want to have to furlough anyone, and I don’t want to have to cut salaries,” he said.Layoffs are of particular concern to church employees because they usually aren’t eligible for unemployment compensation; churches are exempt from state unemployment taxes. The CARES Act, however, includes a Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program that may be available to church employees who lose their jobs.Parishes seek loans as insurance against financial uncertaintyWith guidance and support from their dioceses, congregations across The Episcopal Church are applying for the loans as insurance against financial uncertainty. That uncertainty is expected to persist even as some parts of the country are discussing plans for gradually easing social distancing precautions once the number of new coronavirus cases subsides.The Diocese of Indianapolis announced April 1 that it was making the next two months of apportionment payments to the diocese voluntary for congregations below certain asset and income thresholds. The diocese also detailed other types of relief available to congregations, including the Paycheck Protection Program.The loan program also has figured prominently in other dioceses’ recent communications, from Southern Virginia to Chicago to Los Angeles.California was one of the first states hit by coronavirus outbreaks, prompting shelter-in-place orders early on. Los Angeles Bishop John Harvey Taylor issued a letter March 31 on the financial challenges now facing the diocese’s churches and invited clergy to participate April 2 in an online workshop about the CARES Act. Video of the workshop was posted to YouTube.“The public health crisis has created an economic crisis, and we are all acutely aware of our financial vulnerabilities and responsibilities,” Taylor said in his letter. “How do we address the financial needs of the church at this time? We are all called to remember that everything we have, everything we do, everything we are is a gift from God – and it is a gift that is meant to be shared.”In Wisconsin, the Rev. Kevin Huddleston sent a message on April 3 to the Diocese of Milwaukee outlining the Paycheck Protection Program and other types of relief available. The diocese encompasses the southernmost third of Wisconsin and ranges from larger urban and suburban congregations in and around Milwaukee and Madison to small congregations in far-flung rural counties.“Each parish is in a different place and a different space in this particular time in their lives. Some parishes have resources; some don’t,” Huddleston said in an interview with ENS. He has served for the past month as the diocese’s interim canon for finance.Huddleston also spoke from his experience currently leading two of those congregations: St. John the Divine Episcopal Church in Burlington and Church of the Holy Communion in Lake Geneva, each with typical Sunday attendance of a few dozen.Neither church could afford a full-time priest, but they have shared Huddleston for the past three years as a “kind of experiment.” And while Huddleston encourages congregations across the diocese to consider applying for loans under the CARES Act, he doesn’t think he will do so for his own two congregations. The only paycheck he would need to protect is his own, and most parishioners have been reliably sending in their pledges by check.“The question is, how long will this last?” Huddleston said.– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Churches bank on federal stimulus loans to help weather financial storm tied to COVID-19 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Press Release Service Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Submit an Event Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC Rector Collierville, TN Tags COVID-19 Featured Events Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Job Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Albany, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector Columbus, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Shreveport, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York last_img read more

first_img Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. The Anatomy of Fear Automation has been the labor market’s boogeyman for years. Now the pandemic has created a sense of urgency for workers to uplevel their skills to avoid becoming irrelevant.As The New York Times reports, middle-class jobs typically require some digital proficiency, even for jobs not considered tech work. As of May, about half of US workers were working remotely — up from only 15% in the Before Times — and automation was already becoming more prevalent in fields ranging from retail to health care to warehouse operations.Tech is poised to take jobs, but we still need managersThe need for workers with advanced skills is so great that members of Congress have reached across the aisle to draft the Skills Renewal Act, which would award up to $4k in tax credits to newly unemployed workers seeking training in high-demand areas.Last year Amazon began “upskilling” employees in anticipation of automating simpler tasks. Other businesses like Exelon, a utility company, implemented a training approach called “co-investing,” which means the company funds in-house training, but employees complete it in their off hours.So, what training opportunities should people look for?Data scientists at LinkedIn recently analyzed millions of job listings to determine which ones are in demand, pay a livable wage, and require skills that can be obtained through remote learning.According to our research, the top 5 meeting all those criteria, ranked by number of LinkedIn job listings, are:Sales representatives (~144k job listings on LinkedIn)Software developer (~125k listings)Project manager (~91k listings)Customer service specialist (~90k listings)Data analyst (~21k listings) You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply From The Hustle THE BIG IDEA Please enter your name here TAGSAutomationCareerJobsSkillsThe HustleTraining Previous articleJuly 2020 recognized as Lakes Appreciation Month; Lake Apopka’s north shore highlightedNext articleApopka Police Department Arrest Report Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your comment!last_img read more

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  49 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Giraffe restaurant group has raised £46,929 for ZSL London Zoo in the past year through sales of its falafel burger. For every burger sold, the company donated 50p to The Zoological Society of London (ZSL), the charity that runs ZSL London Zoo.www.giraffe.net Howard Lake | 30 August 2011 | News Tagged with: corporate About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Giraffe’s falafel burgers raise £46,929 for ZSL London Zoolast_img read more

first_img to go further Turkish media freedom’s death throes News TurkeyEurope – Central Asia Condemning abusesEvents WomenJudicial harassmentImprisonedCouncil of EuropeRSF Prize April 2, 2021 Find out more Backed by Reporters Without Borders (RSF), the well-known Parisian street artist C215 will use stencils to repeatedly paint the faces of ten imprisoned Turkish journalists across the urban landscape in several Parisian districts on next weekend, May 27 and 28, in a show of solidarity with all journalists detained in Turkey. “Turkey is now the world’s biggest prison for journalists with dozens in pre-trial detention in harsh conditions on absurd charges,” RSF secretary-general Christophe Deloire said. “Thanks to the talent of Christian Guémy, better know as C215, we are going to use the Parisian public space to display the faces of those that Erdoğan wants to silence. It is a way to show they are not forgotten, and to get the public and decision-makers to support them. It is an unusual operation born of a union between RSF’s campaigning and the concerns of an artist whose stencil techniques make it possible for a powerful message to reach a wide public.” 19 June: Start of the trial of Ahmet Altan and his brother, also a journalist. 6 July: Resumption of the trial of Murat Aksoy and 28 fellow journalists. 24 July: Start of the trial of Musa Kart, Kadri Gürsel, Ahmet Şık and their Cumhuriyet colleagues. 18 September: Start of the trial of Şahin Alpay and 29 other journalists Receive email alerts Campaigns Other upcoming trials of journalists: Portraits of 10 emblematic journalists Help by sharing this information About C215 Organisation More than 500 #SaveTurkishJournalists stencils will also be distributed in Paris with the aim of allowing anyone to use them to show their solidarity and support for journalists imprisoned in Turkey. News Turkey is ranked 155th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2017 World Press Freedom Index.center_img On 15 May, Oğuz Güven became the 12th employee of the opposition daily Cumhuriyet to be jailed in Istanbul. The trial of RSF’s Turkey representative, Erol Önderoğlu, will resume on 8 June. He is facing a possible 14-year jail sentence on a charge of terrorist propaganda. Turkey’s never-ending judicial persecution of former newspaper editor Journalists threatened with imprisonment under Turkey’s terrorism law May 23, 2017 – Updated on May 26, 2017 Parisian street artist joins RSF in campaign for jailed Turkish journalists Follow the news on Turkey Christian Guémy is a leading Parisian street artist who is well known for his stencil work under the moniker of C125. He began painting in 2006, concentrating on portraits. He is politically committed and uses his work to comment on social issues and news developments. His latest show, “La mauvaise réputation” (Bad Rap), opened last weekend at the Galerie Openspace in Paris and will continue until 1 July. #SaveTurkishJournalists News C215 used the following photos to create the stencil portraits that will be painted on the streets of Paris next weekend (27-28 May). With more than 140 media outlets closed, more than 700 press cards rescinded and more than 100 journalists in prison, Turkey’s media and journalists have been subjected to an unprecedented crackdown since a state of emergency was declared in July 2016. RSF_en April 28, 2021 Find out more The artist C215 / Credit: Sylvain Lefeuvre TurkeyEurope – Central Asia Condemning abusesEvents WomenJudicial harassmentImprisonedCouncil of EuropeRSF Prize Human rights groups warns European leaders before Turkey summit April 2, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

first_img Twitter Pinterest Facebook Pinterest By admin – April 29, 2018 GEEK: Differentiate between computer booting, hanging during startup Local NewsBusiness Facebook WhatsApp Twitter >> Jeff Werner is a software engineer and has been writing this column since 2007. Q: First, let me thank you for your great column and help to all of us non-techies out here. My Windows 10 desktop computer has hung up of the first start for about the last 10 weeks. Occasionally it will come on the first time but only maybe about 1 of 20. Any time after about the first 10 seconds I push the restart button and it restarts and finishes the start sequence properly.I just found that I cannot “paste” into the boxes on your web form. Is that by design or my computer problem? I was going to just snip and paste the machine properties.– George C.Shalimar, FloridaA: Well, please allow me to return the compliment, George, and say thanks to you for being a loyal reader, and one of my most prolific content contributors. A quick check of my archives tells me that I’ve used your questions in at least eight columns over the years, which has to be some kind of a record. Seriously though, good, usable questions can be difficult to come by, so I appreciate your periodic queries, as they are part of what keeps the column chugging along.Moving right along, I’m interpreting this problem as a computer that seems to hang during the boot process. I have to say, I have computers that routinely take over a minute or more to boot, so it seems like hitting the old reset button “any time after about the first 10 seconds” is really expecting a lot from your computer. I have to wonder exactly what you’re seeing that leads you to conclude it has hung. Do you check for hard drive activity? Is there a mouse cursor on the screen, and if so, does it move with the mouse? If you hit Caps Lock, or Num Lock, does the LED indicator turn on or off? If you answer “yes” to any of these, your computer probably is not hung, but rather, is busy doing some kind of necessary housekeeping before coming fully to ready for you to use. There are countless things that might cause such a condition. Improper shutdown for example (not using the Start->Shutdown method to power off) can cause Windows to have to re-build file indexes, virtual memory files and lots of other internal stuff. Another example is updates that require the system to restart, and may need extra time to complete during the boot process. Regardless, I can tell you with certainty that the one thing that you don’t want to do when this is going on is pull the plug on the process! Unless you’ve verified with absolute certainty that the computer is genuinely locked-up, the safest course of action is to just leave it be to finish whatever it’s doing behind the scenes.If you’re genuinely convinced that your PC is having problems with booting, there are limited diagnostic methods available for you. Probably the best one I can think of is to create a boot log. A word of warning before doing so: boot logs are highly technical, and can be thousands of lines long. But they do a pretty good job of letting you know what’s going on that Windows isn’t displaying on the screen while you wait for it to come up.It is almost always the case with procedures that require detailed explanations, or the recitation of a lot of steps to follow, and this one is no exception. So, I’ll do what I usually do in these cases, and refer you to a site out on the Worldwide Web that contains instructions on how to accomplish the task. In this case, I recommend you visit TinyURL.com/IGTM-0562, and read what LifeWire author Tim Fisher has to say on navigating the Startup Settings Menu in Windows 10.As far as your problem pasting in my web form, I don’t think the answer lies in either of the choices you gave me. That is to say, it’s not by design, and I don’t think it’s a computer problem. You used the term “snipped” so I’m guessing you tried to use Snipping Tool to paste a screen capture? That form is comprised exclusively of text entry fields, which don’t allow a picture to be pasted into them. You can, however, save a screen capture to your local drive, and upload it using the “Upload a screen capture or other image” selector near the bottom of the form. WhatsApp Previous articleHome Hospice’s butterfly release honors loved onesNext articlePERRYMAN: The fine line of low unemployment adminlast_img read more

first_img Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Donegal Sergeant calls for clarity over law enforcement concerns Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme WhatsApp Facebook Google+ Pinterest Twitter Pinterest Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA WhatsApp Google+center_img Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Facebook A Donegal Sergeant is calling for urgent clarity from the Justice Minister over law enforcement concerns among Gardai as we emerge from the pandemic.It comes as Gardai are said to be confused about how to police the re-opening of pubs, according to a new survey.The Association of Garda Sergeants and Inspectors says members aren’t sure what laws they’re enforcing, and are relying on the media to provide clarity.The survey of middle-ranking officers has found 94 per cent have had difficulty enforcing Covid 19 regulations since restrictions were eased.National Executive member of Connaught Ulster with the AGSI Sgt Paul Wallace the new Justice Minister needs to provide the answers:Audio Playerhttps://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/wafgdgdfgdfgllace.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Community Enhancement Programme open for applications RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR AudioHomepage BannerNews Twitter Previous articleShops losing up to 25% of floor space due to Covid-19Next articleTaoiseachs comments on Good Friday Agreement ‘ridiculous’ News Highland By News Highland – July 8, 2020 Publicans in Republic watching closely as North reopens furtherlast_img read more

first_imgCourtesy DeKalb County State’s Attorney’s Office(BEAVER DAMN, Wisc.) — A Wisconsin man, who allegedly shot his ex-wife multiple times just feet from their young daughter, had no history of violence, his mother told police.Ulisses W. Medina Espinosa was charged on Tuesday with one count of first-degree intentional homicide, under the elements of domestic abuse, after the murder of his ex-wife, 30-year-old Stacia Hollinshead.Hollinshead, an assistant district attorney in Dekalb County Attorney’s Office, was killed on Saturday.Espinosa, 31, is in custody and it is unclear if he has an attorney.Bob Barrington, managing attorney of the Dodge County District Attorney’s office — that’s handling the case — said that Espinosa made an initial appearance in court Tuesday and to $2 million bond was set. The criminal complaint details how police responded to a 911 call made by Espinosa’s mother, Maria Espinosa Rubio. In Spanish, Rubio told the officer that her son shot his ex-wife after he made a surprise visit to his parents house.“He killed her! He killed her! He killed her!” Rubio allegedly told the officer, according to the criminal complaint.Despite settling their divorce approximately two years ago, Hollinshead remained close with her in-laws and had arranged a visit for March 23, through text messages, “so they can see [the] female child,” according to the criminal complaint where Rubio’s statements to police were summarized.Hollinshead was granted full custody of their child by a judge, according to the officer’s statements in the probable cause portion of the criminal complaint.Rubio said during this visit to her Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, home that “suddenly Ulisses arrived at the house” shortly after Hollinshead and the child arrived around 2:15 p.m.Rubio told police that while it was a “surprises visit” it was “very normal that he arrived with gifts for” the child according to the complaint.At one point, Rubio and Hollinshead were in the kitchen and they left Espinosa with his daughter in the living room as he showed “her several toys he brought her.” Rubio said that “she suddenly heard several gunshots that came from behind her. While Rubio was unable to remember how many she heard, she just kept repeating that “she heard many, many gunshots,” according to the criminal complaint.When she turned, she saw Espinosa in the kitchen near where Hollinshead was on the ground “laying on her stomach with blood all over her back,” and she saw him toss a gun in the sink.“Maria told me that she grabbed Ulisses by the arms and screamed at him, ‘What are you doing? What are you doing?’ She said that he did not say anything, had no expression on his face and slowly walked back to female child in the living room,” according to the criminal complaint.Rubio said that her son went to the living room where the little girl was crying, and she ran upstairs to get her sleeping husband before calling 911. Another responding officer found approximately 16 spent shell casings and assessed that Hollinshead was dead at the scene, the report read.The initial responding officer detailed how Rubio told him that her son “has never been violent in his life. She said that this is completely out of his character. She kept telling me, ‘This is not my son. This is not my son.’”Rubio told the officer that the couple “never had any domestic incidents/physical fighting incidents” and that she had “no knowledge of him having any sort of guns/weapons, and has never used them in his past,” according to the criminal complaint.“She told me that he was having a very hard time with the divorce and court cases about female child,” the responding officer reported in the criminal complaint. Rubio told police that Hollinshead did have a restraining order against Espinosa “due to the divorce, but again assured me that he was not an aggressive or angry man,” the report states.Court records show that Hollinshead had a protective order filed against Espinosa in 2016 in DeKalb County, Illinois — the same county where she worked in the state’s attorney’s office at the time of her death.“Maria continued to tell me that she was completely shocked from the incident and could not believe that it was real,” the responding officer wrote in the report.Barrington said that Espinosa’s expected back in court for a preliminary examination on May 23rd. Espinosa is currently being held in Dodge County’s detention facility in Juneau, Wisconsin.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

first_imgA tranche of part-qualified IPD members will see their subscriptions rise by25 per cent from July after failing to become fully qualified within theinstitute’s proscribed time limit.Under rules introduced at the IPD’s formation in 1994, affiliates, associatesand licentiates taking IPD qualifications only have to pay 75 per cent of thesubscription rate until they finish training. But the subsidy is provided foronly five years, and the first discount period expires this summer.A copy of the letter sent by the IPD to those affected, obtained byPersonnel Today, says the subsidy will end in 1 July 2000 with the expiry ofthe first five-year period. “This period is considered to offer membersworking towards meeting our standards a reasonable time within which to becomequalified.”The loss of the subsidy has caused disquiet among part-qualified members.Some said they were unaware they were on any kind of subsidy. And one trainingprofessional pointed out the loss of subsidy had come as the IPD embarked on acostly rebranding exercise as part of achieving chartered statuswww.ipd.co.uk Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. Part-qualified members pay subs penaltyOn 7 Mar 2000 in Personnel Todaylast_img read more